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Monday, July 21, 2014

Top 10 magnesium-rich foods to boost your intake of this essential mineral

Top 10 magnesium-rich foods to boost your intake of this essential mineral

 

(NaturalNews) Magnesium is one of the most important -- and yet often overlooked -- nutraceutical required for a healthy body and mind. Magnesium plays an important role in more than 300 biochemical reactions and processes in the body (1), but despite its importance, many people fail to get enough of the mineral in their regular diet. In fact, some reports estimate that as many as 80% of Americans don't get enough of this important mineral. (2)

Magnesium helps keep the immune system healthy, fights depression, helps prevent high blood pressure and muscle twitches like restless leg syndrome and reduces your risk of migraine headaches. (3) Some experts say the mineral may also play an important role in preventing Alzheimer's disease and colon cancer. (4)

So how can you make sure that you're getting enough magnesium in your diet? By adding a few foods that are super-rich in this vitally important mineral. Here's a list of the top 10 magnesium-rich foods to help you get started:

  • Greens: Green, leafy vegetables like spinach, Swiss chard, and turnip and beet greens contain from 31 mg to 156 mg of magnesium for every one-cup serving (spinach contains the most, turnip greens the least). Eating these greens raw in salads or lightly steamed are the best ways to ensure that you're maximizing your nutrient intake.
  • Seeds and nuts: When it comes to magnesium content, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds pack a punch, ranging from 113 mg (sunflower) to 192 mg (pumpkin) or more per quarter-cup serving. Cashews provide 117 mg of magnesium, and almonds offer about 62 mg of the mineral each per quarter-cup serving.
  • Organic tempeh: This soy product not only proves itself a versatile ingredient in the kitchen but also provides about 87 mg of magnesium per 4-ounce serving. A cup of raw soybeans offers a little less than twice that amount at 147 mg.
  • Organic tofu: If you like the idea of eating more soybeans, but tempeh just isn't your thing, you can still get soy's boost of magnesium by consuming tofu, which offers about 66 mg of magnesium per 4-ounce serving.
  • Cacao: Ounce per ounce, cacao is one of the world's richest sources of magnesium. Name sound unfamiliar? Scramble the letters a bit -- cacao is what we get cocoa and chocolate from. Its real name is Theobroma cacao, its genus name literally meaning "food of the gods." Cacao contains nearly 100 milligrams of magnesium for every 1-ounce serving, or 272 milligrams per 100 grams of cacao. The beans also contain a significant amount of other important nutrients, including powerful antioxidants which can battle the effects of aging.
  • Quinoa: This ancient grain contains the most magnesium, offering about 118 mg of the nutrient per three-quarter-cup serving. Not crazy about quinoa? Buckwheat and oats are other good grain sources of magnesium, containing 86 mg per 1-cup serving of buckwheat and 69 mg per quarter-cup serving of oats.
  • Summer squash: This nutrient-rich veggie can be prepared in a variety of ways, making it a pleasing choice for many different tastes and palates. Low in calories, summer squash still offers a good source of magnesium -- about 43 mg per one-cup serving. Winter squash offers about 27 mg for the same size serving. Other good veggie sources: beets, broccoli and Brussels sprouts, offering 39 mg, 33 mg and 31 mg of magnesium per 1-cup serving, respectively.
  • Raspberries: If you love fresh fruit, you have several options to boost your magnesium intake. Raspberries are one of the biggest fruit sources of the mineral, offering about 27 mg per 1-cup serving. Cantaloupe and strawberries both offer about 19 mg per 1-cup serving.
  • Black beans: Several types of beans offer high levels of magnesium, with black beans topping the list at about 120 mg per one-cup serving. Navy beans come in second at about 96 mg per 1-cup serving, followed by pinto beans at 86 mg and lima beans at 81 mg per 1-cup serving.
  • Seafood: The highest sources of magnesium come from plant sources, but if you really crave some seafood, tuna offers a respectable 48 mg of magnesium per 4-ounce serving, while scallops provides 42 mg of the mineral for the same size serving.


As you can see, magnesium can be found in a wide variety of foods. That's good news for people who like a varied diet. Even better news: All these foods contain other important nutrients, and including them in your meal planning is a great way to ensure that you stay as healthy as possible. Just be sure to choose organic products and produce to maximize your health benefits and avoid GMOs.

Source:

(1) http://blog.timesunion.com

(2) http://www.naturalnews.com

(3) http://www.naturalnews.com

(4) http://www.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Monday, July 21, 2014

Magnesium deficiency symptoms explained: Do you show any of these?

Magnesium deficiency symptoms explained: Do you show any of these?

(NaturalNews) Vitamins and minerals are essential to good health. They help build tissues and bones, transport and regulate our hormones, allow us to fight off infections and strengthen our immune systems. When we have a vitamin or mineral deficiency, it plays havoc with our bodies and our health. And the mineral magnesium is no exception.

What does magnesium do?

Every organ in your body needs magnesium. It contributes to the formation of your teeth and bones, helps activate essential enzymes, regulates blood calcium levels, aids in the production of energy and regulates other essential nutrients such as zinc, copper, potassium and vitamin D. Our hearts, kidneys and muscles all require magnesium as well.

Foods high in magnesium include nuts, whole grains and green leafy vegetables, but it is difficult to get enough magnesium from dietary sources. Even when you do get enough magnesium from your diet, many things can deplete your body of this essential mineral. These include a viral illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, pancreatitis and kidney disease. Stress, menstrual periods and excessive use of coffee, salt, alcohol and soda can also deplete your magnesium stores.

Magnesium deficiency symptoms explained

A magnesium deficiency can present itself with very specific symptoms. If you are experiencing any of these, a lack of magnesium may be the cause.

  • Depression - A study by the George Eby Research Institute reported at Science.NaturalNews.com (1) posits that a magnesium deficiency can cause neurological dysfunction and "neuronal injury" in the brain, which can lead to depression. Studies from as early as 1921 support this conclusion. A more recent clinical trial, conducted in 2008, proved that magnesium was as effective as antidepressants in treating diabetic patients with depression, without any of the harsh side effects of drug treatments.



  • Restless leg syndrome - Restless leg syndrome has only recently been recognized by the medical community, but those who suffer from it know that it has always been all too real. The condition causes a feeling of jitteriness and muscle tension in the legs, and sometimes the arms as well. The feeling is usually described as a constant, irresistible need to move the affected limb. Since the symptoms are usually worse at night, it can make sleep nearly impossible.



  • Abnormal heart rhythms - Also known as palpitations, abnormal heart rhythms are often experienced as a "flip flop" sensation in the chest or a feeling of the heart skipping a beat. The frightening sensation can last for just a few seconds or for a minute or more. According to an article published by the University of Maryland Medical Center (2), women with the highest level of dietary magnesium had the lowest risk of cardiac death. Men with an increased magnesium intake had a lower incidence of coronary heart disease. Intravenous magnesium, the article continues, is used in hospitals to reduce the chances of cardiac arrhythmias and atrial fibrillation.
  • Muscle spasms - Anyone who has had a Charlie Horse knows how painful muscle spasms can be. A deficiency in magnesium can cause muscles anywhere in the body to spasm when under tension -- as when reaching for something, standing or even sneezing. Ironically, the muscles can also spasm when they have been at rest. This can cause sufferers to have frightening muscle spasms in the middle of the night which can often only be relieved by standing or walking.



  • Migraine headaches - An article, "Headache, Migraine - In-Depth Report," posted by The New York Times (3), cites magnesium supplementation as a non-drug treatment for migraines. Some studies, the article states, have shown a link between a magnesium deficiency and an increased risk for migraines, especially with patients who have migraines associated with their menstrual cycle. Magnesium is also known to relax blood vessels, and many headaches, according to the article, are caused by "muscle contraction and uneven blood flow." Anything that helps address these problems is likely to help with migraines.

 

Supplementation

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may want to consider taking a quality, high-end form of magnesium. The recommended minimum daily intake is, according to National Institutes of Health Fact Sheet (4), 400 to 420 mg for healthy men over the age of 18, 360 mg for adult women who are still menstruating, and 320 mg for post-menopausal women, although it varies with developmental stages and factors such as pregnancy and lactating. Because the balance of calcium and magnesium in your body can affect your heart, if you are being treated for heart disease, check with your doctor before taking magnesium supplements.

Source:

1) http://science.naturalnews.com

2) http://umm.edu

3) http://www.nytimes.com

4) http://ods.od.nih.gov


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Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Omega-3 supplements improve joint health, lessen severity of osteoarthritis and provide a host of other health benefits

Omega-3 supplements improve joint health, lessen severity of osteoarthritis and provide a host of other health benefits (EFA Plus)

 

(NaturalNews) Omega-3 fatty acids may improve joint health and reduce the risk and severity of arthritis, according to a study conducted by researchers from Duke University and published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases on July 11.


The findings suggest that, contrary to prior belief, the types of fats that make up a person's diet may have more influence on their arthritis risk than their weight does.

"Our results suggest that dietary factors play a more significant role than mechanical factors in the link between obesity and osteoarthritis," senior author Farshid Guilak, PhD, said.

What you eat, not what you weigh

Prior studies have established that obesity is a major risk factor for osteoarthritis, a disorder characterized by degradation of the joints and more commonly known simply as "arthritis." Until now, scientists have assumed that a higher body weight causes increased wear-and-tear on the joints, but this hypothesis never explained why arthritis is so common in non-weight-bearing parts of the body such as the hands.

In a previous study, the Duke University researchers found that abnormally low levels of the appetite-regulating hormone leptin in obese mice were an accurate predictor of arthritis. This suggested that metabolic, rather than physical, symptoms of obesity might actually be behind arthritis.

"This made us think that maybe it's not how much weight you gain, but what you eat," Guilak said.

To further explore the connection between diet and arthritis, the researchers induced osteoarthritis in mice by deliberately injuring their knees. Trauma or injury is responsible for approximately 10 to 15 percent of all osteoarthritis cases. The arthritic mice were then fed either a diet high in saturated fat, a diet high in omega-6 fatty acids or a diet high in omega-6 fatty acids with a small amount of added omega-3s.

"A healthy diet would include roughly equal ratios of these fats, but we're way off the scale in the Western diet," Guilak said.

Health researchers now believe that the typical Western diet contains too much saturated and omega-6 fat, and not enough of omega-3 fat.

Omega-3s slow disease progression, speed wound healing

The researchers found no connection between body weight and arthritis. They did find that, while mice on both the saturated fat and omega-6 diets experienced a worsening of their arthritis symptoms over time, mice in the omega-6 plus omega-3 group did not.

"While omega 3 fatty acids aren't reversing the injury, they appear to slow the progression of arthritis in this group of mice," Guilak said. "In fact, omega 3 fatty acids eliminated the detrimental effects of obesity in obese mice."

The researchers also noticed that mice in the omega-3 group healed faster from an injury that the researchers had inflicted on their ears (a way to differentiate between the mice) than the mice in the other two groups.

"We found that independent of body weight, dietary fatty acids regulate ear wound healing and severity of osteoarthritis following joint injury in obese mice," lead author Chia-Lung Wu said.

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Arthritis Foundation, the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and a Taiwan GSSA graduate fellowship. It is only the latest in a glut of recent research illuminating the many health benefits of a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids.

A strong body of clinical research now shows that omega-3s are potent anti-inflammatories that can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and arthritis. They are also important for brain health and particularly important for the brain development of babies and children. They may also play a role in regulating mood and cognitive function.

Research has also linked omega-3s to a reduced risk of cancer and improved bone, bowel and menstrual health.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.newswise.com

http://www.sparkpeople.com

http://www.greenmedinfo.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Dark chocolate found to enhance blood flow to legs

Dark chocolate found to enhance blood flow to legs


"Polyphenol-rich nutrients could represent a new therapeutic strategy to counteract cardiovascular complications," senior author Francesco Violi, MD, said.

Dark chocolate improves walking endurance

Peripheral artery disease is characterized by obstructed or narrowed arteries decreasing the blood flow between the heart and the brain, stomach, legs and hands. Common symptoms include fatigue, cramping or pain in the hips and legs.

Dark chocolate is particularly high in plant compounds known as polyphenols, particularly flavanols. Polyphenols -- found to a certain degree in all plant foods -- act as antioxidants in the body, and evidence increasingly suggests that they may play a key role in promoting health and fighting disease. Evidence suggests that the high polyphenol content of chocolate may be behind many of its disease-fighting benefits.

"Nutrients are key components of health and disease," said study co-author Lorenzo Loffredo, MD.

Researchers assigned 20 peripheral artery disease patients between the ages of 60 and 78 to eat 40 grams of either dark chocolate or milk chocolate. The dark chocolate was made with at least 85 percent cocoa, to give it a high polyphenol content. The milk chocolate had a cocoa content of just 30 percent.

Just before eating the chocolate and two hours after, participants walked on a treadmill and researchers measured their performance. Researchers found that people who had eaten the dark chocolate walked 15 percent longer after eating the chocolate than they had before eating it. In addition, they walked 11 percent farther before tiring than people who had eaten the milk chocolate.

"Our body secretes chemicals that naturally dilate blood vessels in response to certain stimuli, improving the blood flow to certain areas," said Dr. Richard Chazal, vice president of the American College of Cardiology, who was not involved in the study. "Some of the chemicals inside dark chocolate could affect the way these enzymes are metabolized in the body."

More than just flavanols

Another recent study, conducted by researchers from Wageningen University in the Netherlands and published in the FASEB Journal in February 2014, suggests that it may be more than just flavanols behind chocolate's benefits for blood vessel health.

Researchers assigned 44 overweight men between the ages of 45 and 70 to eat 70 g per day of either normal dark chocolate or dark chocolate specially processed to have an especially high flavanol content. The cocoa content of the two chocolates was similar. The men were directed to maintain their weights by not eating other high-calorie foods during the study.

After two weeks, the researchers found that both groups showed equal increases in measures of blood vessel health, including flow-mediated dilation (FMD), augmentation index (AIX), reduced leukocyte (white blood cell) count, decreased plasma sICAM1 and sICAM3 and reduced expression leukocyte adhesion markers. These changes indicate that white blood cells were not sticking to blood vessel walls as much, and that the arteries were more flexible and less hardened.

Other studies have linked dark chocolate consumption to a lowered risk of stroke, and to less age-related memory loss.

People who choose to increase their chocolate consumption for health benefits should be sure to get chocolate with as high of a cocoa content as possible. In addition, look for brands that make it clear that they have not removed the bitter flavanols in a misguided attempt to improve flavor. Finally, remember that chocolate can be high in sugar and fat, so consume in moderation.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.counselheal.com

http://www.designntrend.com

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com

http://www.thelancet.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

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Friday, July 4, 2014

Improper nutrition linked to oral health problems

Improper nutrition linked to oral health problems


According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, ". . . nutrition is an integral component of oral health" and "collaboration between dietetics practitioners and oral health care professionals is recommended for oral health promotion and disease prevention and intervention."

Oral health problems that can occur with improper nutrition

While the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics stresses that the most common chronic oral health condition is the development of cavities, they also note that tooth loss caused by periodontal disease is a serious concern.

Both tooth decay and periodontal disease can be caused by a variety of factors including poor at-home oral hygiene habits, infrequent dental visits, certain medications and smoking. Regarding diet, it's no secret that consumption of sugary foods plays a role since they leave a sticky residue that can erode teeth.

Even stress, which can be kept at bay with the help of a balanced diet, can contribute to oral health problems. When stressed, a person often grinds and clenches teeth, which can produce wear over time.

Finally, jaw development can change based on diet. One study by the University of Kent showed a correlation between types of foods consumed and the chewing habits required to ingest those foods. The findings showed that the lower jaw specifically grew too short with a "soft" diet, demonstrating an association between societal shifts regarding reliance on wild plants and foods compared to today's reliance on domesticated choices. Today's modern foods typically consist of more traditional, softer junk food diets: think of ground up burgers and soft donuts and the finding makes sense.

Best foods and vitamins to keep oral and overall health in shape

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends "Eating a healthy balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, lean protein and low-fat dairy products and whole grains that provide essential nutrients for optimum oral health and overall health."

Some fruits and vegetables include oranges and strawberries since their vitamin C helps fight gum inflammation. Raisins and cranberries have polyphenols that have been shown to keep plaque from sticking to teeth.

Non-soft foods such as celery and carrots are also important. Christine D. Wu, pediatric dental researcher from the University of Illinois, says that "Things like carrots and apples aren't only loaded with antioxidants, they can help mechanically clean your teeth" by breaking up plaque.

Also, when pregnant, know that a baby's teeth start to develop as soon as the fifth week of pregnancy. Its suggested that a pregnant mother consume vitamins A, C, D, protein, calcium and phosphorous.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.eatright.org/Media/content.aspx?id=6442476249#.U0PpFCxOW00

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111122112032.htm

http://worldental.org

http://www.natural-home-cures.com

About the author:
A science enthusiast with a keen interest in health nutrition, Antonia has been intensely researching various dieting routines for several years now, weighing their highs and their lows, to bring readers the most interesting info and news in the field. While she is very excited about a high raw diet, she likes to keep a fair and balanced approach towards non-raw methods of food preparation as well.



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Friday, July 4, 2014

Inadequate vitamin C levels boost risk of most deadly type of stroke by nearly 50 percent

Inadequate vitamin C levels boost risk of most deadly type of stroke by nearly 50 percent (Beyond Tangy Tangerine 2.0)

 

 

(NaturalNews) Every year in the US, more than 800,000 people suffer the devastating effects of a stroke, and 150,000 will die as a consequence of the fourth-leading cause of mortality. The sad part of this story is that many of these deaths are preventable by altering lifestyle habits and adhering to a diet that eliminates highly processed foods in favor of fruits and vegetables delivered as nature intended. Elevated blood pressure and a cascade of poor lifestyle choices combine to cause arterial stiffening with age, dramatically increasing the risk of a fatal ischemic event. Increased physical activity is a well known strategy for lowering blood pressure, and a diet including adequate vitamin C intake is now hailed for its ability to improve arterial elasticity that improves the risk of suffering a stroke.

Researchers from the Pontchaillou University Hospital in France will release the results of a study to the American Academy of Neurology showing how eating foods containing vitamin C, such as oranges, peppers, strawberries, papaya and broccoli, may be linked to a reduced risk for hemorrhagic stroke. Hemorrhagic stroke is a less-common cause of the ailment compared to ischemic stroke but is more deadly and occurs when a weakened blood vessel in the brain ruptures and allows blood to leak into and around the brain.

Vitamin C from diet and supplements improves vascular elasticity to lower heart disease and stroke risk

To conduct this study, team members analyzed 65 patients who had experienced a hemorrhagic stroke and contrasted with an age- and health-comparable group of 65 healthy counterparts. Lead author Dr. Stephane Vannier noted, "Our results show that vitamin C deficiency should be considered a risk factor for this severe type of stroke, as were high blood pressure, drinking alcohol and being overweight in our study." After an analysis of vitamin C blood levels, the scientists found that 41% of all participants had normal levels, 45% had depleted levels, and 14% had levels so low that they were considered deficient in vitamin C.

After following the participant group over the course of 10 years, researchers determined that the participants who had experienced a stroke had depleted levels, while the ones who had not had a stroke had normal levels of vitamin C in their blood. In support of their findings, the team noted that a 2008 University of Cambridge study found that people with high blood levels of vitamin C reduced their stroke risk by 42%. They also cited a 2012 study indicating that consuming chocolate may lower risk of any stroke. That research found that men who ate the largest amounts of chocolate had a 17% lower risk of stroke than men who never or very rarely ate it.

Catherine Paddock, PhD, wrote at Medical News Today, "[O]ne way vitamin C might reduce stroke risk could be by reducing blood pressure, and he adds that vitamin C has other benefits, like helping to make collagen, a protein that gives structure to skin, bones and tissue." Most citrus fruits and vegetables supply healthy amounts of vitamin C to the diet, and most studies have found that supplementing with vitamin C (1,500 to 3,000 mg per day) dramatically lowers the risk of vascular diseases including heart disease and stroke.

Sources for this article include:

https://www.aan.com

http://www.nydailynews.com

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

About the author:
John Phillip is a Certified Nutritional Consultant and Health Researcher and Author who writes regularly on the cutting edge use of diet, lifestyle modifications and targeted supplementation to enhance and improve the quality and length of life. John is the author of 'Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan', a comprehensive EBook explaining how to use Diet, Exercise, Mind and Targeted Supplementation to achieve your weight loss goal. Visit My Optimal Health Resource to continue reading the latest health news updates, and to download your copy of 'Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan'.


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Friday, July 4, 2014

More good news for chocolate eaters - cocoa flavanols lower risk of obesity and diabetes

More good news for chocolate eaters - cocoa flavanols lower risk of obesity and diabetes (Triple Treat Chocolate)

 

 

(NaturalNews) It should come as no big surprise to alternative health followers that many foods in their unprocessed form contain a host of protective compounds that have repeatedly been shown to promote human health. Fruits and vegetables contain flavonoids that protect vegetation from disease and pests, and many provide antioxidant support to help prevent a large variety of chronic illnesses when consumed by people. Dark chocolate has received extensive research coverage over the past several years to explain how natural compounds from cocoa protect against vascular conditions including cardiovascular disease and stroke.

A new body of research now provides evidence to show that eating dark chocolate in moderation can aid weight management to prevent obesity and thwart metabolic deterioration to help prevent diabetes. Two out of three Americans are either overweight or obese, and as many as one-third or more are pre-diabetic or have been diagnosed as diabetic. A research study team from the Department of Food Science and Technology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, has released the results of their findings in the Journal of Agricultural Food and Chemistry that demonstrates how flavonols from cocoa found in dark chocolate are helpful in preventing weight gain and can also lower blood glucose levels.

Dark chocolate compound aids weight management and lowers blood sugar to slash diabetes risk

Prior studies have confirmed that that eating chocolate, as well as wine and berries, protects against type 2 diabetes, while other research has found that teens who consume higher amounts of chocolate tend to be slimmer. To conduct their study, the scientists set out to determine which of the previously identified cocoa flavonols were responsible for the positive health benefits exhibited by those eating dark chocolate. Using a mouse model known to simulate human metabolism, researchers assigned mice to one of six different diets for a period of 12 weeks.

The different diets consisted of high and low-fat diets, with the high-fat diets supplemented with either of three different types of flavanols (identified as monomeric, oligomeric or polymeric procyandins). Mice were given 25 mg of these flavanols each day for every kilogram of their body weight. The research team found that a high-fat diet supplemented with oligomeric procyandins was the most effective for maintaining the weight of the mice and improving glucose tolerance, a factor that could help prevent type 2 diabetes.

The research team concluded "Oligomeric PCs appear to possess the greatest anti-obesity and anti-diabetic bioactivities of the flavanols in cocoa... Therefore, our data suggest that moderate doses of cocoa flavanols or cocoa powder have the potential to be more effective in human clinical trials than previously thought." It is important to note that the scientists performing this study used 70 grams of dark chocolate (equivalent to 2 scored pieces of chocolate) to achieve the reported results, and indicated that increasing this amount had no additional positive effect on weight management or diabetic risk.

Sources for this article include:

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf500333y

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-04/acs-kci040214.php

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/275008.php

About the author:
John Phillip is a Certified Nutritional Consultant and Health Researcher and Author who writes regularly on the cutting edge use of diet, lifestyle modifications and targeted supplementation to enhance and improve the quality and length of life. John is the author of 'Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan', a comprehensive EBook explaining how to use Diet, Exercise, Mind and Targeted Supplementation to achieve your weight loss goal. Visit My Optimal Health Resource to continue reading the latest health news updates, and to download your copy of 'Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan'.

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Friday, July 4, 2014

Vitamin D supplementation - how will it help me improve my health?

Vitamin D supplementation - how will it help me improve my health? (Beyond Osteo FX)

 

(NaturalNews) Imagine a line stretching across the U.S. from Philadelphia in the East to just north of San Francisco in the West. That's about 40 degrees latitude. If you live north of that line, chances are, you're not getting enough vitamin D. And even if you live in the more southerly latitudes, if you're not getting outside to enjoy the sunshine for at least 15 minutes each day, it's pretty likely you're not getting enough D either. Likewise if you're dark-skinned, overweight or older.

That's because most of us get our D vitamins through sun exposure. When exposed to the UV rays of the sun, compounds in the skin work to convert chemicals into vitamin D. People in more northern latitudes are seasonally limited to the amount of sun they receive, and for those who have dark skin or who are older, the skin isn't as efficient at converting sunlight to vitamin D.

Vitamin D is different from other vitamins because it's available in only a few foods -- mostly fatty fish and mushrooms that have been exposed to UV rays. As a result, vitamin D supplementation is typically the best way for most people today to ensure that they get enough of the vitamin.

Until just a few decades ago, vitamin D's effects were largely believed to be solely related to healthy bones. Researchers understood that vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which is essential for healthy bone development. But more recently, evidence has surfaced that's shown there's much more to this vitamin than originally believed.

Strengthening Bones and Muscles

Multiple studies have shown that the risk of fractures, especially among older people, is significantly higher when vitamin D levels are low. In a summary of evidence found in 12 studies, researchers determined that taking vitamin D supplements reduced hip and other non-spinal fractures by 20 percent. (1)

And another study found that, among an older population, vitamin D's muscle-strengthening powers helped decrease the risk of falls -- a common cause of disability and death -- by nearly 20 percent. (2)

Preventing Heart Disease

Just like bone and muscle cells, heart cells also have special receptors that attract and bind vitamin D. No surprise, since the heart itself is a type of muscle. Multiple studies have found that vitamin D deficiency contributes to heart disease, although the reasons why aren't clearly understood. Many researchers believe that it's because vitamin D can help prevent three of the most common diseases that contribute to heart disease -- high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and diabetes.

Preventing Cancer

To date, studies have shown a strong link between low levels of vitamin D and the development of colorectal cancers, but more studies are being conducted to learn how the vitamin may play a role in the development and prevention of other cancers, including breast and prostate cancers.

Preventing Kidney Disease

Studies conducted during the past decade have shown that low levels of vitamin D play a role in the development of kidney disease, but as recently as last year, researchers learned that monitoring the levels of the vitamin can actually help identify the disease in its earliest stages before significant kidney damage occurs. According to the results of that study, people with deficient levels of vitamin D were two times as likely to have protein in their urine -- a condition known as proteinuria, one of the earliest signs of kidney damage. (3)

Strengthening the Immune Function

Low levels of vitamin D have been shown to contribute to tuberculosis, multiple sclerosis, flu and even the common cold. It's also been associated with type I diabetes, the type of diabetes that's related to the immune system and begins almost exclusively in childhood. Low levels of vitamin D have also been associated with type II diabetes, which usually occurs in adults over the age of 40 and is not associated with the immune system. Most researchers believe that the vitamin's ability to ward off inflammation is at the root of its immune-boosting abilities. (4)

Studies indicate that about 1 billion people worldwide are deficient in vitamin D. (5) Especially in recent years, vitamin D's role in preventing a host of diseases is becoming more clearly understood. Multiple studies are underway to explain these roles, but one thing is clear: Getting enough vitamin D is vitally important to maintaining good health. Since getting enough of the vitamin can be so difficult, taking a supplement is the best way to enjoy its benefits.

Source:

(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

(2) http://www.bmj.com

(3) http://www.kidney.org

(4) http://www.hsph.harvard.edu

(5) http://www.nejm.org

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Lower liver cancer risk by drinking coffee daily

Lower liver cancer risk by drinking coffee daily (Youngevity JavaFit Coffee)

(NaturalNews) Coffee, after decades of bad press, is finally coming into its own. There continue to be health reports that note the benefits of having a daily cup of coffee. In addition to research which shows that a daily cup of java could have positive effects on a person's ability to stave off strokes, Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes, recent research has shown that coffee drinkers can now add a lower risk of getting a certain type of liver cancer to the benefits of downing their favorite beverage.

 

Most common type of liver cancer foiled

Researchers from the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Southern California have shown a positive correlation between drinking coffee and a lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. These findings, targeted to this type of liver cancer, also known as HCC, were presented at the American Association of Cancer Research's annual meeting. During that presentation, researchers noted that people who are at high risk for HCC should aim to drink coffee on a daily basis.

According to V. Wendy Setiawan, Ph.D., a doctor and associate professor at the Department of Preventive Medicine at the University of California, the study involved following 179,890 women and men over the course of 18 years. The study participants were of varying races, including Latinos, Caucasians, Hawaiian Americans, African Americans and Japanese Americans. Researchers tracked the participants' coffee consumption, as well as other factors related to their lifestyles.

Of the participants in the study, 498 of them were eventually diagnosed with HCC. Researchers, however, noted an interesting correlation between the amount of coffee consumed and the likelihood of the study's participants to develop cancer. For those people who drank, on average, one to three cups of coffee each day, their risk for developing HCC was 29% lower compared to those who drank less than six cups of coffee each week.

Greater coffee consumption equals lower liver cancer risk

Even more startling were the results of those people who drank four, or more, cups of coffee each day. These people showed a 42% lower risk of developing liver cancer. While these results are encouraging, they are not the first time that a positive relationship between coffee consumption and a lower risk of liver cancer has been shown.

Years of studies show a positive result

In 2013, a study published in the medical journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology analyzed published data from years of studies. The studies pulled included 16 from between 1999 and 2012, with results showing a 40% reduction in the risk of HCC with the consumption of coffee. Additionally, the risk was slashed by 50% when individuals drank at least three cups of coffee each day.

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com

http://www.thedoctorwillseeyounow.com

http://www.latimes.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

About the author:
Sandeep is an mountain climber, runner, and fitness coach. He shares his tips for staying in shape and eating healthy on quickeasyfit.



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Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Turmeric as effective for treating disease as 14 different conventional drugs, study finds

Turmeric as effective for treating disease as 14 different conventional drugs, study finds (Cell Shield RTQ)

 


Researchers at GreenMedInfo, an organization dedicated to providing evidence-based resources to the world, found turmeric to have over 600 potential preventive and therapeutic applications and 175 distinct beneficial physiological effects. Click here for a downloadable PDF of medically researched data regarding turmeric.

Turmeric is an ancient spice traditionally used in India that gives curry its yellow color. It not only is tasty but contains highly effective compounds with medicinal properties. The most beneficial compound in turmeric is curcumin, which is also its most active ingredient, offering strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.

A research project conducted by GreenMedInfo found that turmeric is capable of replacing a variety of conventional medications designed to treat various conditions including plaque build-up in arteries, inflammation and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes, inflammatory eye disease, depression, arthritis and many more.

It's been proven to be a common replacement for aspirin or ibuprofen, offering pain-fighting and anti-inflammatory abilities in a more natural way.

Below are the conventional medications that GreenMedInfo found turmeric could either replace or supplement:

Lipitor/Atorvastatin (cholesterol medication): A 2008 study published in the journal Drugs in R & D discovered that curcuminoids, found in turmeric, can be used to treat endothelial dysfunction, a condition affecting the functionality of blood vessels. Researchers also believe that curcumin can help treat inflammation and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetic patients.

Corticosteroids (steroid medications): A 1999 study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research found that curcumin can treat chronic anterior uveitis, an inflammatory eye disease, similar to the way steroids are used, but in a safer, healthier fashion.

Another study found that curcumin can act as an alternative therapy for protecting lung-transplantation-associated injury, working similarly to the corticosteroid drug dexamethasone, but without the side effects.

Prozac/Fluoxetine & Imipramine (antidepressants): A 2011 study published in the journal Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica found that curcumin worked in treating depression, potentially capable of replacing psychotropic drugs like Prozac.

Aspirin (blood thinner): A 1986 study published in the journal Arzneimittelforschung (Drug Research) found that curcumin has "anti-platelet and prostacyclin modulating effects compared to aspirin," and might be capable of treating patients prone to blood clots and requiring anti-arthritis therapy.

Anti-inflammatory Drugs: A 2004 study published in the journal Oncogene found curcumin to be an effective alternative to drugs like aspirin, ibuorofen, anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals and tumor-cell-fighting medications.

Oxaliplatin (chemotherapy drug): A 2007 study published in the International Journal of Cancer discovered that curcumin could be used to treat colon cancer, potentially replacing oxaliplatin.

Metformin (diabetes drug): A 2009 study published in the journal Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications found that curcumin might be valuable in treating diabetes and increasing glucose uptake. Researchers think that it may also be capable of suppressing glucose production in the liver in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, one of the most common cancers worldwide.

Scientists found curcumin to be 500 times to 100,000 times more potent than the diabetes drug metformin.

Overall, the benefits of Turmeric are quite amazing. It's no wonder its been used by humans for thousands of years. If you decide to take supplements containing curcumin extract, be sure to consume it with black pepper containing piperine, an all natural substance that helps with curcumin absorption.

Because curcumin is fat soluble, it also helps to take it with a fatty meal.

Additional sources:

https://www.clinicalkey.com

http://www.drugs.com

http://heartdisease.about.com

http://https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov

http://authoritynutrition.com

 

 






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Saturday, June 21, 2014

Low Vitamin D levels increase risk of early death for 66% of Americans

Low vitamin D levels increase risk of early death for 66 percent of Americans

 

(NaturalNews) The sun is quintessential in facilitating life on planet Earth, meeting the biological requirements of species in all forms. In addition to making our existence possible, sunlight makes us feel good, and according to a new study, keeps us alive longer.


While some places on Earth experience endless amounts sunshine, others aren't so lucky. Large populations residing in colder regions consider sunlight a delicacy, many flocking to the Sunbelt of the southern and southwest United States. The equator divides the Earth's surface between the North Pole and the South Pole. The further you are away from the equator, the greater of an angle the sun hits the atmosphere, making it more difficult to absorb the sun's most natural rays, or ultraviolet B (UVB).

Those of us fortunate enough to live in the Sunbelt, have less to worry about when it comes to getting enough vitamin D. The amount of sunlight needed to maintain vitamin D levels depends on a few different factors including the time of day, where you live, the color of your skin and the amount of skin you expose.

Your body produces more vitamin D when exposed to natural light during mid-day when the sun is it hottest. Pale skin absorbs sunlight faster therefore requiring less time spent outside. Those of us with pale skin require about 15 minutes of direct sunlight daily, and those with darker skin tones could need up to two hours in order to acquire enough of the sunshine vitamin.

Factors like air pollution, altitude levels, the weather, and sunscreen can also affect how much sunlight you absorb.

Sunlight essential for optimal health

 

Regardless of the limitations, getting enough vitamin D is extremely important to living a healthy and happy life. The sunshine vitamin helps facilitate muscle function, strengthens your bones, decreases your chance of heart disease and even reduces the likelihood of getting the flu.

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine discovered people with the lowest levels of vitamin D in their blood were 90 percent more likely to die prematurely than those with the highest concentrations of the vitamin. People with vitamin D levels of 30 ng/ml or less experienced a higher risk of dying early.

The study's lead researcher, Dr. Cedric Garland reported that approximately 66 percent of the U.S. population suffers from vitamin D deficiency.

"Three years ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) concluded that having a too-low blood level of vitamin D was hazardous," said Dr. Garland, professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at UC San Diego.

"This study supports that conclusion, but goes one step further. The 20 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml) blood level cutoff assumed from the IOM report was based solely on the association of low vitamin D with risk of bone disease. This new finding is based on the association of low vitamin D with risk of premature death from all causes, not just bone diseases."

The study published in the June 12 issue of American Journal of Public Health, analyzed the blood of more than a half a million participants with an average age of 55, throughout 14 different countries. The publication examined the relationship between vitamin D blood levels and various types of death from 32 studies conducted over nearly an 80 year period.

While foods like salmon, sardines, egg yolks, shrimp, and milk provide us with vitamin D, it's difficult to obtain the amount required through foods, but taking vitamin D supplements can do the trick if you're reluctant or unable get sun exposure.

It's also important to remember that people 50 years or older require more vitamin D than younger folk, and getting too much sun that results in burning is dangerous. "Research to date shows that moderate but frequent sun exposure is healthy but overexposure and intense exposure can increase your risk of skin cancer," according to a report by the Vitamin D Council.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.savingadvice.com

http://www.natureworldnews.com

http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219962" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219962

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin... target="_blank">http://www.vitamindcouncil.org




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Saturday, June 21, 2014

Celadrin....the answer to your osteoarthritis pain!

Celadrin®… the Answer to Your Osteoarthritis Pain! (CM Cream)

With roughly 27 million Americans suffering from Osteoarthritis (OA), chances are you know someone who is currently experiencing osteoarthritis pain. One of the most recognized and debilitating forms of osteoarthritis is knee OA. Those who suffer from knee OA, know how increasingly difficult any form of physical activity, even just getting up from your seat, becomes. It’s a painful and even debilitating condition and it’s no surprise that knee OA leads to lower physical activity. Many who suffer from knee OA are inclined to weight gain and obesity; further adding to their health problems. The good news is that there is increasing evidence growing on the use of Celadrin® to help alleviate OA pain; and help increase physical activity.

 

Celadrin® is an all-natural ingredient that has been medically and clinically proven to deal with pain management and restoration. It includes a proprietary blend of cetylated fatty acid esters and other active synergists that help to enhance joint function, mobility and recovery.1 There have been many studies conducted on the use of Celadrin® and the treatment of osteoarthritis; all demonstrating compelling results.

 

Recently, Celadrin® was found to significantly improve walking performance in a group of individuals who participated in study that sought to determine if even a low dose of Celadrin® would improve function and decrease pain in individuals suffering from knee OA. The study, Fatty Acids Improves Knee Function, Mobility, took two groups (one of which was given a placebo) and followed them over an 8 week period. The participant’s pain levels were evaluated using a 6 minute timed walk, a variety of pain scales and questionnaires, and other knee function measures. What the study found was that the participants who had consumed Celadrin® experienced a 42% increase in their 6 minute walk test and showed and 180% overall improvement.2 The study also included a wide-range of prior research conducted on Celadrin®, all of which demonstrated improved physical performance and decrease in bone and joint pain. You can learn more about Celadrin® as well as several other scientifically-backed nutritional ingredients in, Research Studies Demonstrating Ingredient Benefits of Youngevity® Bone and Joint Health Care Products, available in the Product Info Center.

 

With so many individuals living with osteoarthritis pain, and even being debilitated due to it, using products that contain Celadrin® may help provide them the relief they need and improve their quality of life. Ultimate™ CM Cream™ is one of Youngevity’s best-selling products due to the pain-alleviating benefits it has provided to many individuals. Products such as Ultimate™ CM Cream™ may help improve function to those suffering from bone and joint pain, including osteoarthritis.

Stop living with bone and joint pain! Prevention is the key!

 

 

 

 







Rocio Ramos
Contributing Writer
Youngevity Marketing Team

 



SOURCE:
1 http://youngevity.com/wp-content/themes/youngevity/media/YGY-Joint-Research_brochure-0214-singles-4review.pdf
2 JK Udani, MD; B Singh, PhD; M Torreliza, M Crabtree, BA; G Zhang, PhD. Celadrin® Improves Walking Performance. 2014. Available from: http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/

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Thursday, June 19, 2014

Vitamin D deficiency causes weight gain; here's how to drop the pounds effortlessly by boosting your vitamin supplementation

Vitamin D deficiency causes weight gain; here's how to drop the pounds effortlessly by boosting your vitamin supplementation

(NaturalNews) For years, the mathematical equation offered to those trying to lose weight seemed simple enough: Burn more calories than you consume. Piece of cake, right? Unfortunately, as with almost everything concerning the human body, it's not quite as simple as that. Over the years, more and more scientific evidence leaks out -- confirming what many of us have suspected all along -- that proves that weight gain and loss is affected by many, many factors. Among them: genetics, gender, age, hormones, stress levels, exposure to toxins and many health conditions. Even social and environmental factors can come into play.

 

Vitamin D deficiency causes weight gain

More than one of the most recent studies about weight gain has linked it to a vitamin D deficiency. A study reported by The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN) (1) found that women whose blood levels of vitamin D reached healthy levels through supplementation during a diet and exercise program lost more weight than those whose blood levels did not. Another study, also published by AJCN (2), showed that the benefits of weight loss -- lower blood pressure, lower blood sugar and insulin levels, and lower blood lipid levels -- were increased in participants who took calcium and vitamin D during their weight-loss program. Still, another study, reported on at SCIENCE.NaturalNews.com (3), showed that people of Asian Indian decent were much more susceptible to obesity and insulin resistance when they were deficient in vitamin D.

The link between vitamin D and weight loss is not clearly understood. Some scientist speculate that special vitamin D receptors on fat cells tell them whether they should be burned as energy or stored as excess body weight. Receptor cells in the brain that control metabolism and hunger levels may need vitamin D to function properly as well.

Vitamin D has also been shown to reduce the systemic inflammation that is associated with being overweight. So, even if you cannot lose as much weight as you would like, having adequate vitamin D levels lessens the stress on your body and, therefore, the harmful effects of carrying extra body weight.

Other vitamin D deficiency factors to consider

Besides weight gain, vitamin D deficiencies have been linked to many other diseases, some of which can also lead to gaining extra pounds. Low blood levels of vitamin D have been linked to depression, for example, and the fatigue and listlessness of depression can lead to inactivity which can, in turn, contribute to weight gain. Vitamin D deficiencies have also been linked to poor blood-sugar control in the body. This can contribute to both weight gain and the risk of developing diabetes.

Serious conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) have also been linked to inadequate levels of vitamin D, and the resulting inactivity can lead to weight gain which can, in turn, exacerbate the symptoms of both of these conditions. Both RA and MS are sometimes treated with prednisone, a corticosteroid whose side effects include weight gain.

The best sources

According to The World's Healthiest Foods (4), the best dietary sources of vitamin D include fatty fish such as cod, tuna, mackerel and salmon. Cow's milk and eggs also have vitamin D. Some mushrooms, especially if they've been exposed to ultraviolet light, are also a good source of this important vitamin.

While your skin can manufacture D from sunlight, many factors can slow this process: the season, the weather, how far north you live, pollution levels and even the use of sunscreen. Most people will need to take dietary supplements to reach the recommended levels.

Other weight-loss tips

There is no magic pill when it comes to dieting. Even though adding vitamin D supplementation to your routine can be a great first step toward shedding unwanted pounds, don't forget to make other sensible changes to your lifestyle as well. Try to get at least 30 minutes of exercise five or six times a week, for example. You should also cut processed sugars from your diet and eat lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Replace animal fats in your diet, as well -- such as those found in red meat, milk and cheese -- with heart- and waistline-loving polyunsaturated and monounsaturated oils like those found in olive oil and avocados.

Sources:

1) http://ajcn.nutrition.org

2) http://ajcn.nutrition.org

3) http://science.naturalnews.com

4) http://whfoods.org


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Thursday, June 19, 2014

Vitamin E better than any medication at saving brain tissue during a stroke

Vitamin E better than any medication at saving brain tissue during a stroke

(NaturalNews) Dr. Cameron Rink points to a picture of a brain that is currently undergoing a stroke, noting in particular the dark, feathery arteries that branch out across grayish brain tissue. Some of that tissue has faded to black around the vessels which are obstructed, and they very much resemble a city block that has lost power as the rest of the city remains well-lit.


"That part of the brain is not getting blood or oxygen and the cells are dying. There's not much we can do for a patient at this point and that's frustrating," Dr. Rink, a professor of surgery at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, said.

It is easy to understand all of his frustration. After more than two and a half decades and the failure of some 1,000 experimental neuroprotective medications, only aspirin and tPA, the so-called "clot-busting" drug, are all that traditional medical science is offering to patients after they've suffered a stroke. And of the two, tPA is only used in about 4 percent of all stroke cases, said the university in a press release.

Prevention is the key

But Dr. Rink has long been convinced that such "after the fact" approaches don't really do much to prevent disability and death. So, for the past dozen years, Rink has focused his research on stroke prevention, and it is finally beginning to pay dividends.

What's more, one of the most promising of treatments is a natural alternative.

In published studies involving animals, Dr. Rink and fellow researchers write that they have discovered that brain damage during a strike can be prevented by triggering the surrounding blood vessels to dilate, thereby redirecting blood flow around a blockage.

The blood vessel "redirection" is the result of 10 weeks' worth of supplementation with a little known type of vitamin E called tocotrienol, which appears to stimulate arteriogenesis, or "the remodeling of existing blood vessels that can instantaneously expand in response to a demand for oxygen-rich blood," the press release states. And the creation of a collateral blood supply can make a huge difference in the outcome of strokes.

"We know that people who have good collaterals have better recovery from strokes. We think that tocotrienol helps improve the function of collaterals, which would offer someone better protection from an initial or secondary stroke," said Dr. Rink, who is currently participating in a study of stroke survivors to see if the supplement can help prevent or reduce damage from secondary strokes -- which can often be more disabling and costly than the first stroke.

More from the university's release:

To find out exactly how tocotrienol is impacting blood vessel remodeling, Rink pioneered a technique using laser capture microdissection (LCM) to take microscopic pieces of brain tissue and blood vessels from the exact area where collaterals are called into action during a stroke.

The LCM samples also give Rink a chance to study micro-RNA activity during a stroke. Micro-RNAs are tiny snippets of non-coding DNA that turn off the production of proteins created by genes, proteins that give cells a range of different instructions. By identifying the micro-RNAs, Rink will be able to find out what's happening at a genetic level during a stroke, and how tocotrienol may be influencing those genes.


More funding for more studies

The tocotrienol, which is formed naturally in palm oil, is a vitamin E variant and is currently available as an oral nutritional supplement. And because it does not interfere with other stroke therapies or have any side effects, Dr. Rink says he believes that the vitamin could someday become a common stroke-prevention strategy.

The university said that Dr. Rink's research was given pilot funding from Ohio State's Center for Clinical and Translational Science in 2012 to study tocotrienol's impact on stroke. The center has been studying the supplement for the past two years.

His initial findings also led to an additional funding grant from the American Heart Association, and Dr. Rink would like to apply for an RO1 grant in the next two years after the publication of several more studies on animal and human subjects.

"The animal studies are helping inform the optimal tocotrienol dose and therapeutic window for our human studies, so it's a great example of how the basic research is informing clinical studies, and helping us move the research forward faster," Dr. Rink said.

Sources:

http://www.newswise.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://www.sciencedaily.com

http://science.naturalnews.com




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Sunday, June 8, 2014

Vitamin C supplementaion in pregnant smokers improves lung function of newborns

Vitamin C supplementaion in pregnant smokers improves lung function of newborns


The study was released online to correspond with its presentation at the American Thoracic Society International Conference. Findings from the research had also been previously presented at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in May 2013.

"Getting women to quit smoking during pregnancy has to be priority one, but this finding provides a way to potentially help the infants born of the roughly 50 percent of pregnant smokers who won't or just can't quit smoking no matter what is tried," researcher Eliot Spindel said.

Lifelong consequences to pregnant smoking

More than half of all smokers who become pregnant fail to quit during their pregnancy, meaning that 12 percent of pregnant women are current smokers. Yet studies have shown that children exposed to tobacco in utero suffer from hampered lung development and lifelong hindering of lung function. Such children score lower on pulmonary function tests (PFTs) at birth, are more likely to suffer from childhood asthma, and are more likely to be hospitalized for respiratory infections. Other studies have shown that children born to women who smoked during pregnancy suffer decreased pulmonary function until as late as 21 years of age.

"Although smoking cessation is the foremost goal, most pregnant smokers continue to smoke, supporting the need for a pharmacologic intervention," the researchers wrote. "This emphasizes the important opportunity of in-utero intervention. Individuals who begin life with decreased PFT measures may be at increased risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease."

Prior studies have indicated that vitamin C might prevent some of the negative pulmonary effects of in utero nicotine exposure. The new study was performed on 159 pregnant smokers who were fewer than 22 weeks pregnant at the study's start and who had been unable to quit smoking. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either a placebo or 500 mg of vitamin C daily. All participants were also given a daily prenatal vitamin. The children of these mothers were compared to each other, as well as to the children of 76 nonsmokers.

All children in the study were given a PFT within 72 hours of birth, measuring the infants' lung size, ease of lung motion, and ease of inhaling and exhaling. The parents were contacted again a year later to report any cases of wheezing or other respiratory problems during the first year of life.

Improved lung health

The researchers found that children of smokers who had taken vitamin C scored significantly higher on their PFTs than children of smokers given the placebo. Children in the vitamin C group were also significantly less likely to have experienced wheezing by age 1 than children in the placebo group. Among those who had experienced wheezing, children from the vitamin C group were significantly less likely to have needed medication.

By age 1, however, there was no difference in PFT scores between children in the vitamin C and placebo groups.

The researchers also found that a genetic variant known to be associated with a higher risk of smoking-induced cancer and difficulty quitting smoking (including higher risk of relapse) was also associated with more harmful effects of maternal smoking on newborn lung formation.

"Though the lung function of all babies born to smokers in our study was improved by supplemental vitamin C," lead author Cynthia T. McEvoy said, "our preliminary data suggest that vitamin C appeared to help those babies at the greatest risk of harm during their development from their mother's smoking in pregnancy."

(Natural News Science)

Sources for this article include:

http://media.jamanetwork.com

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130504163306.htm

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1873133


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Sunday, June 8, 2014

Turmeric shown to protect brain against fluoride poisoning

Turmeric shown to protect brain against fluoride poisoning (Cell Shield RTQ)

(NaturalNews) The neurodegenerative effects of fluoride are well documented in the scientific literature, and yet this toxic byproduct of industrial manufacturing continues to get dumped into the water supplies of almost every major city in the U.S. without consent. And while it may take a little more time before a critical mass of folks finally wakes up and puts a stop to this mass poisoning of the public, there is a way you and your family can better avoid the toxic effects of fluoride today through proper nutrition.

Publishing their findings in a recent issue of Pharmacognosy Magazine, a research team out of India observed that regular consumption of turmeric, a spice commonly used in Indian and Asian cuisine, helps to protect the mammalian brain against fluoride poisoning. Having previously uncovered the pathways through which fluoride induces harmful neurodegenerative changes in the brain, the team from Mohanlal Sukhadia University found that turmeric both neutralizes existing fluoride and protects against additional fluoride.

Testing the effects of turmeric in mice, the researchers observed that curcumin, the most well-known nutritive compound in turmeric, produces powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity that protects against multiple forms of cell damage, including singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical damage. Curcumin also helps spur the production of glutathione, the body's "master antioxidant" that studies have shown plays a primary role in guarding against oxidative stress.

Supplementing with turmeric can completely reverse damage caused by fluoride

Knowing that fluoride induces both neurotoxic and neurodegenerative effects on brain tissue, particularly that of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, the team tested the effects of fluoride alone, fluoride in combination with turmeric, turmeric alone and a control on mice that were randomly divided into each of these four groups. All the mice consumed their respective regimens for 30 days before undergoing analysis.

At the end of the study period, it was observed that mice in the fluoride group, which were given 120 parts per million (ppm) of fluoride in water without curcumin, experienced significant increases in malondialdehyde (MDA) activity -- MDA is a recognized marker of oxidative stress. Mice consuming the same amount of fluoride along with 30 milligrams per kilogram of body weight (mg/kg), however, experienced a marked reduction in MDA, revealing the toxicity-mediating power of turmeric.

"[Fluoride] may cross the blood brain barrier, accumulate in mice hippocampal neuron cell bodies and initiates cascade of reactions which increases the oxidative stress that causes an increase in MDA content of brain tissue, which is an end product of LPO [lipid peroxidation]," wrote the authors.

"On the other hand, a distinctive decrease in MDA level was observed after [curcumin] treatment, compared to group treated with [fluoride]... [because] this phytochemical is capable of quenching oxygen free radicals such as superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals, which are important for the initiation of LPO."

Fluoride is an 'excitotoxin' like MSG that causes brain neurons to die

Concerning the general toxicity of fluoride, the team is convinced, based on more than a decade of extensive research, that the chemical very clearly collects and accumulates in brain tissue. Similar to the way that monosodium glutamate (MSG) over-excites brain neurons and essentially kills them, fluoride likewise produces an excitotoxic effect that can have lasting health consequences.

"Fluoride (F) is probably the first inorganic ion which drew attention of the scientific world for its toxic effects and now the F toxicity through drinking water is well-recognized as a global problem," explains the study. "Health effect reports on F exposure also include various cancers, adverse reproductive activities, cardiovascular, and neurological diseases."

You can view the curcumin/fluoride study in its entirety here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://www.fluorideresearch.org

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

 




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Sunday, June 8, 2014

Vitamin D and osteoporosis: How this 'miracle' vitamin can restore optimum bone health in men and women

Vitamin D and osteoporosis: How this 'miracle' vitamin can restore optimum bone health in men and women (Osteo FX Plus)

 

 

(NaturalNews) More than 50 million Americans suffer from osteoporosis, literally "porous bones," a condition that occurs when your body doesn't replace bone cells that are lost naturally over time. (1) Lose too much bone, and your bone density drops, making you much more prone to fractures, especially as you age. Vitamin D has been identified as a primary role player in preventing osteoporosis. Here's how it can help you prevent the disease:

Vitamin D and healthy bones
Nearly everyone understands that calcium is important for developing healthy, strong bones: Calcium helps bones remineralize and make new bone cells to prevent weaknesses and fractures. But many people are unaware that, without adequate vitamin D, calcium would be unable to do its job.

Calcium is one of the most prevalent and most important minerals in your body, and about 99 percent of the calcium that your body contains is found in the teeth and bones. (2) We get calcium from the foods we eat, but once we consume those foods, the calcium needs to be absorbed into the blood and tissues in order to do its job.

Vitamin D helps calcium be absorbed into the blood stream so it can travel to the bones and other parts of the body where it can be used. Without vitamin D, your body would not be able to absorb enough calcium to produce new bone cells and keep your bones strong.

In addition to helping prevent bone loss, vitamin D can also help prevent fractures by strengthening muscles and nerves, making bone-breaking falls less likely to occur.

The link between vitamin D and osteoporosis

People who develop osteoporosis tend to have significantly lower levels of vitamin D in their blood compared to people who don't have the disease. (3) Several studies have examined this link to determine whether taking vitamin D supplements can help prevent the disease from occurring. So far, the results of these studies have been encouraging.

For instance, in one study from the United Kingdom, researchers found that women who took vitamin D supplements had stronger, denser bones than women who were not given the supplement, suggesting that supplementation may provide a viable way to prevent the bone loss that typifies the disease. (4) Likewise, a study from the U.S. looked at older patients with and without osteoporosis and found that those who took vitamin D supplements had a significantly lower level of fractures than those who did not take the supplements. (5)

Are you at risk for osteoporosis?
Osteoporosis can affect anyone, but some people have characteristics or habits that place them at greater risk for developing the disease. These are the primary risk factors for developing osteoporosis:

  • Female gender (women are about twice as likely as men to have osteoporosis)
  • Older age
  • Caucasian or Asian race
  • Family history
  • Small bone structure
  • Low sex hormone levels
  • Overactive thyroid, parathyroid or adrenal glands
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Smoking
  • Excessive use of alcohol
  • Poor diet/eating disorders
  • Use of some medications, including steroids and some medicines for cancer, depression, immune disorders, gastric reflux and seizures

Especially if you have one or more of these risk factors, taking vitamin D may help prevent or slow the bone loss and loss of bone density that can result in osteoporosis. (6)

Getting enough D
We can get vitamin D from some of the foods we eat, including fatty fish and milk, and we can also get vitamin D from sun exposure. The ultraviolet rays in sunlight cause changes in our skin which help chemicals called previtamin D convert into vitamin D that can be used by our bodies. However, sunscreen, shade and seasonal changes can all have an impact on how much UV exposure our skin receives. In fact, several studies have shown that decreased sun exposure during the winter months results in lower levels of vitamin D and, subsequently, higher numbers of fractures. (7) (8) (9)

Because modern diets and lifestyles can prevent us from getting enough vitamin D through these natural sources, taking a supplement can be an important part of making sure that the body receives enough of the vitamin to help prevent bone loss and to experience other benefits of the vitamin.

Vitamin D helps build strong bones, and it can also help the body in other ways, including strengthening the immune system, preventing diabetes, treating high blood pressure -- even decreasing the risk of certain types of cancer. If you're concerned that you may not be getting enough vitamin D in your regular routine, taking a vitamin supplement could be an ideal solution for ensuring that you're experiencing all the benefits of this miracle vitamin.

Source:

(1) http://nof.org

(2) http://nof.org

(3) https://www.vitamindcouncil.org

(4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

(5) http://www.nejm.org

(6) http://www.mayoclinic.org

(7) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

(8) http://jn.nutrition.org

(9) http://osteoporosis.org.za

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Sunday, June 8, 2014

More bad news for sugar - Research confirms it is a leading cause of heart disease

More bad news for sugar - Research confirms it is a leading cause of heart disease


A research study team from New Zealand's University of Otago, publishing in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, has conducted a review and meta-analysis of a large cohort of dietary studies comparing the effects of higher and lower added sugar consumption on blood pressure and lipids, both of which are important cardiovascular risk determinants. Lead study author, Dr. Lisa Te Morenga and her students have uncovered solid and documented evidence that eating sugar has a direct effect on risk factors for heart disease, and is likely to negatively impact blood pressure and blood lipids. Dr. Te Morenga noted, "Our analysis confirmed that sugars contribute to cardiovascular risk, independent of the effect of sugars on body weight."

Sugar and refined carbohydrates increase risk of hypertension and cholesterol abnormalities

The scientists analyzed a total of 49 nutritional intervention trials conducted between 1965 and 2013. Comparing diets where the only intended differences were the amount of sugars and non-sugar carbohydrates consumed by the participants allowed for the measurement of the effects of these diets on lipids and blood pressure. 37 trials reported the effects of dietary sugars on lipid metabolism while another 12 yielded results on blood pressure. The team then pooled the available data to determine the impact on measurable risk factors that affect human health.

The team noted that some of the data provided by the studies was skewed as the research was funded by the food/sugar industries. When they factored out those biased results, they found a startling pool of data conclusively demonstrating the negative impact of high-sugar diets on cardio-metabolic risk factors. Small increases in blood pressure, as little as 20 mm Hg systolic and diastolic, can double the risk of a heart attack, while changes to cholesterol metabolism can alter the delicate endothelial lining of the arteries affecting plaque formation and blood clotting.

While the food industry and media outlets continue to promote a wide spectrum of processed, sugar packed foods as a means to boost their bottom line profit margins, millions of uninformed people continue to consume 156 pounds of added sugar each year. Recently, sugar has been making news as it has been associated with increased risk of many forms of cancer, as well as stroke and Alzheimer's dementia. The evidence should be clear to any health-minded individual -- eliminate all sources of empty sugar and refined food products in favor of foods in their natural form to dramatically lower the risk of heart disease and most chronic illnesses.

Sources for this article include:
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2014/05/07/ajcn.113.081521
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-05/uoo-sii051414.php
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140515095633.htm

About the author:
John Phillip is a Certified Nutritional Consultant and Health Researcher and Author who writes regularly on the cutting edge use of diet, lifestyle modifications and targeted supplementation to enhance and improve the quality and length of life. John is the author of 'Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan', a comprehensive EBook explaining how to use Diet, Exercise, Mind and Targeted Supplementation to achieve your weight loss goal. Visit My Optimal Health Resource to continue reading the latest health news updates, and to download your copy of 'Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan'.


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Friday, May 30, 2014

Latest study links vitamin D deficiency in men to increased risk of prostate cancer

Latest study links vitamin D deficiency in men to increased risk of prostate cancer


One of the latest studies confirms the importance of having proper levels of vitamin D in the system, concluding that men with low levels of vitamin D are at an increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

The study, conducted by researchers at Northwestern University, assessed 275 European-American men and 273 African-American men between the ages of 40 and 79.

Overall, African-American men were 4.89 times more likely to develop prostate cancer while European-American men with the lowest levels of vitamin D were less likely to develop it: 3.66 times more likely. When men with the lowest levels of vitamin D were assessed, African-American men were 4.22 times more likely to develop a later stage tumor, called a T2b tumor, which is isolated in the prostate. In comparison, European-American men with the lowest vitamin D levels were only 2.42 times more likely to get this tumor.

It's suggested that skin coloring and sunlight absorption ability (a main way to obtain vitamin D naturally) plays a role. Researchers explain that this could be a possible reason why the African-American men had an increased risk of developing prostate cancer, as these numbers suggest.

Top vitamin D researcher, William Grant, Ph.D., agrees. He says, "Those with darker skin should take higher vitamin D supplementation."

Best ways to increase vitamin D levels

Aside from exposing the body to sunlight for up to 30 minutes twice weekly, a vitamin D supplement may be taken to boost its levels in the system. Vitamin D can also be found in certain foods such as salmon and whole milk, but fortunately it also exists in almond milk (one cup has about 100 IU of vitamin D) and in mushrooms.

Certain mushrooms in particular have been identified as a good source. For example, portobello mushrooms contain about 400 IUs of vitamin D per 3-ounce serving, or one cup, diced. Some experts advise resting purchased mushrooms in sunlight to reap the benefits. Paul Stamets, Founder of Fungi Perfecti and an advisor at the Program of Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona Medical School, Tucson explains that " . . . up to 12 hours of sun exposure to upside-down (gills up) shiitakes created 46,000 IU of vitamin D . . ."

Sources for this article include:

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.foxnews.com

http://www.livestrong.com

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/vegan-sources-vitamin-d-3797.html

About the author:
A science enthusiast with a keen interest in health nutrition, Antonia has been intensely researching various dieting routines for several years now, weighing their highs and their lows, to bring readers the most interesting info and news in the field. While she is very excited about a high raw diet, she likes to keep a fair and balanced approach towards non-raw methods of food preparation as well.



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Friday, May 23, 2014

Daily vitamin B3 intake could help treat degenerative childhood disease

Daily vitamin B3 intake could help treat degenerative childhood disease (Pollen Burst)

 

(NaturalNews) Vitamin B3 may be a miracle treatment for the genetic childhood disease Friedreich's ataxia -- which currently has no treatment or cure -- according to a study conducted by researchers from Imperial College London, University College London and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)/Wellcome Trust Imperial Clinical Research Facility, and published in the journal The Lancet.

The study was funded by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, the European Friedreich's Ataxia Consortium for Translational Research, and four European ataxia charities.

"We are really proud to have supported the basic science for this hugely exciting trial and to have moved the research forward to a human trial with such positive early findings," said Sue Millman, CEO of Ataxia UK.

"This study was a truly collaborative effort involving ataxia charities in four countries and a number of other funding bodies all recognizing the importance of the study. We now need to push forward towards a larger trial which we hope can eventually be translated into a treatment for patients. That is our goal."

Vitamin changes gene expression

Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited, progressive disease that leads to the degeneration of speech and movement. It occurs most often in childhood and typically results in patients being able to move about only by wheelchair within 10 to 20 years, with complete incapacitation eventually following. There is no known cure or even treatment for the disease, and patients require lifelong assistance just to get their basic needs met.

The disease is caused by a partial inactivation of the gene responsible for producing a protein called frataxin. Prior studies by Richard Festenstein, the lead researcher of the new study, had suggested that a form of vitamin B3 known as nicotinamide could reactivate the frataxin gene in cells taken from Friedreich's ataxia patients, leading to an increase in frataxin levels.

In the new study, researchers tested nicotinamide on living Friedreich's ataxia patients for the first time. Participants were given increasing doses of the vitamin, which was found to be well tolerated. The researchers found that, after two months of taking daily nicotinamide supplements, patients' frataxin levels increased to levels typically found in asymptomatic Friedreich's ataxia carriers.

The vitamin B3 doses used were much higher than those found in typical vitamin supplements.

"These results are very encouraging and importantly offer the prospect of a future treatment for this incurable condition," Festenstein said.

"The study is also exciting because it provides proof-of-concept that aberrant gene silencing can be overcome in humans using an 'epigenetic modifier'. This opens the way to a radical approach for other disorders caused by a similar mechanism."

Working toward a cure

"Finding a cure for Friedreich's ataxia is what every researcher in the field dreams about," researcher Vincenzo Libri said. "We're absolutely thrilled by our preliminary results and the hope it offers for the future of patients with this devastating condition and their families. Our results help us understand the key elements of how nicotinamide may work and are important for translating the research from the laboratory into a clinical treatment."

The researchers and funders of the study emphasized that further research will be needed to confirm the results or turn them into an actual treatment.

"We are excited by the prospects of nicotinamide potentially being developed into a treatment but it is important to remember that we still need to conduct further trials to confirm the safety over a longer time and to see whether the increase in Frataxin actually results in improvements for patients," researcher Paola Giunti said. "We are extremely grateful to all the patients who have taken part in this important pilot trial."

Sources for this article include:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk

http://www.sciencedirect.com

http://science.naturalnews.com


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