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Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Magnesium and your health

Magnesium and your health (Beyond Osteo FX)



(NaturalNews) Magnesium is present in all cells of the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic processes, including energy production. Magnesium is essential for maintaining normal bone density, normal cardiac rhythmicity, normal pulmonary function, and normal blood glucose regulation. Magnesium is one of the most common world-wide deficiencies and it plays a role in most of the common health struggles people face every day.

Most doctors are not trained to detect magnesium deficiencies. Magnesium deficiency is often misdiagnosed because it does not show up in blood tests as only 1% of the body's magnesium is stored in the blood (1).

Dr. Norman Shealy's, M.D., Ph.D. is an American neurosurgeon and a pioneer in pain medicine says, "Every known illness is associated with a magnesium deficiency," and that, "magnesium is the most critical mineral required for electrical stability of every cell in the body. A magnesium deficiency may be responsible for more diseases than any other nutrient. (2)"

Magnesium deficiency rates:

Research has shown that 68% of individuals in the US do not consume the daily recommended amount of dietary magnesium and 19% do not even consume half of the RDA levels which are 310-420mg daily (3). Most researchers believe this RDA level is far too low and if it was raised to where it should be we would see that roughly 80% of Americans are consuming insufficient quantities (4).

Magnesium is a basic element of life much like water and air. We need a lot of magnesium, roughly 1000 mgs/day for a healthy active individual to keep up with the demands of the body. Magnesium is to the body like oil is to a car's engine and if we are deficient problems will arise.

Calcium: magnesium ratios:

Our current diet is rich in calcium but insufficient in magnesium. Our ancient ancestors had a a diet that was close to 1:1 whereas our present-day diets are more like 5:1 and up to 15:1. Having roughly ten times more calcium than magnesium is a serious problem (5).

This elevated calcium to magnesium ratio is a major player in conditions such as mitral valve prolapse, migraines, attention deficit disorder, autism, fibromyalgia, anxiety, asthma and allergies. Wherever there is elevated calcium and insufficient magnesium inside of cells the effects are muscle contractions, spasms, twitches and even convulsions (6).

Magnesium and detoxification:

Without sufficient magnesium the body struggles to make and utilize protein and enzymes. It is also unable to properly methylate and detoxify and/or process and utilize anti-oxidants like vitamin C and E.

Magnesium is extremely critical for proper detoxification processes. As our world has gotten increasingly more toxic, our need for magnesium has increased. Meanwhile, the nutrition of our modern food has increasingly been diminished. This is due to overcropping, poor composting and pesticides/herbicide chemical residue which reduces nutritional quality of the soil and produce.

Major symptoms associated with magnesium deficiencies:

Research has shown links between magnesium deficiency and the following health conditions (7)

  • Mitral valve prolapse
  • Cardiac arrythmias
  • Migraines
  • ADHD
  • Autism
  • Anxiety
  • Asthma
  • Allergies
  • Chronic Pain
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Muscle Spasms
  • Insomnia
  • Twitching & tremors
  • Swelling/edema
  • Weak pulse
  • Brain fog/confusion
  • Osteoporosis

 

Best food sources of magnesium:

The densest sources of bioavailable magnesium are in the following foods

  1. Raw, grass-fed dairy products
  2. Pumpkin seeds
  3. Raw green veggies
  4. Raw cacao
  5. Pink salt and unrefined sea salts
  6. Wild-caught fish
  7. Sea vegetable - kelp/nori/dulse
  8. Sprouted nuts/seeds
  9. Avocados
  10. Sprouted legumes


Sources for this article include:
1) http://www.afibbers.org

2) http://www.greenmedinfo.com

3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

4) http://ods.od.nih.gov

5) http://drsircus.com

6) http://drcarolyndean.com

7) http://umm.edu

About the author:
Dr David Jockers is a Maximized Living doctor and owns and operates Exodus Health Center in Kennesaw, Georgia where he specializes in functional nutrition, functional medicine and corrective chiropractic care to get to the underlying cause of major health problems.

His website features great articles on natural health and incredible recipes. He is the author of the best-selling book SuperCharge Your Brain - the complete guide to radically improve your mood, memory and mindset. He has over 45,000 active followers on his social media and email newsletter and is a big influencer in the Primal Health movement.

Dr. Jockers is also available for long distance consultations and health coaching to help you beat disease and reach your health goals.

L

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Tuesday, September 9, 2014

The second brain: Gut bacteria control human behavior to get the best nutrients

The second brain: Gut bacteria control human behavior to get the best nutrients


(NaturalNews) Gut bacteria may manipulate what we eat in order to ensure for themselves the best environment, researchers from the University of California-San Francisco, Arizona State University and the University of New Mexico have suggested, in a research review published in the journal BioEssays.

Their work, which reviewed prior research on the connection between gut flora and human psychology and behavior, was funded by the American Cancer Society, the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin and the National Institutes of Health.

"Bacteria within the gut are manipulative," researcher Carlo Maley, PhD, said. "There is a diversity of interests represented in the microbiome, some aligned with our own dietary goals, and others not."

Do bacteria give us cravings?

So many bacteria live within our digestive tracts -- they outnumber our own cells nearly a hundredfold -- that some scientists have described them, collectively, as an ecosystem or "microbiome." Within this ecosystem, different species have different needs and rise and fall in relative abundance depending on the nature of their environment.

One of the major determining factors of our intestinal environment, of course, is the food we eat. Some gut bacteria prefer to consume fat, for example, while others prefer sugar. That's why the researchers have suggested that gut bacteria might seek to actively manipulate their environment for their own benefit. That, in turn, would mean manipulating our behavior by means of food cravings, food aversions or feelings of distress that are only satisfied by eating certain foods.

Although there is no direct evidence for such manipulation, the researchers noted one study which found different microbial metabolites in the urine of people who identified as "chocolate desiring," compared with people who described themselves as "chocolate indifferent," even when both groups were fed identical diets.

While it is unclear exactly what mechanisms bacteria would use to manipulate our behavior, there is strong theoretical support for just such a possibility. Research has confirmed a strong connection between the makeup of our gut flora and the functioning of the immune, nervous and endocrine (hormonal) systems. Some research has suggested that bacteria may release signaling molecules that affect the activity of the vagus nerve, which runs from the gut to the base of the brain.

"Microbes have the capacity to manipulate behavior and mood through altering the neural signals in the vagus nerve, changing taste receptors, producing toxins to make us feel bad, and releasing chemical rewards to make us feel good," senior author Athena Aktipis, PhD, said.

Another study found that humans who drank a probiotic beverage of Lactobacillus casei showed improvement in mood, but only if they felt very low before drinking it.

The power of dietary changes

Even if bacteria affect our behavior, we are far from helpless. What we eat is the greatest determiner of what type of bacteria live in our guts; the guts of people living in Japan, for example, contain specialized bacteria that aid in the digestion of seaweed.

In fact, studies have shown that we can change the composition of our gut flora within as little as 24 hours after changing our diet.

"Our diets have a huge impact on microbial populations in the gut," Maley said. "It's a whole ecosystem, and it's evolving on the time scale of minutes."

The study confirms that changing the makeup of the microbiome -- whether through changing the diet or consuming prebiotics or probiotics on one hand, or taking antibiotics on the other -- might have great implications for health, the researchers said.

"Targeting the microbiome could open up possibilities for preventing a variety of disease from obesity and diabetes to cancers of the gastro-intestinal tract," Aktipis said. "We are only beginning to scratch the surface of the importance of the microbiome for human health."

Sources for this article include:

https://ucsf.box.com [PDF]

http://www.ucsf.edu

http://www.dailymail.co.uk

http://www.counselheal.com

http://psychcentral.com

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Tuesday, September 9, 2014

The surprising health benefits of butter

The surprising health benefits of butter



(NaturalNews) The 20th century was not kind to butter. Like eggs, coconut oil and many other nutritious foods, this beloved dairy product, which is made by churning fresh or fermented cream or milk, was a victim of the misguided war on saturated fats that began in the 1950s. As a result of this war, the consumption of "low fat" butter substitutes, such as margarine, actually exceeded that of butter itself. Consequently, cases of heart disease and other cardiovascular conditions rose to unprecedented levels over the next few decades, prompting many researchers to question whether natural, high-fat foods were the culprits after all.

Of course, we now understand that foods high in saturated fats are actually very good for us and produce a large number of health benefits. This is especially true of organic butter sourced from grass-fed, sustainably raised cows.

Reasons to love butter

Rich in saturated fats -- It turns out that the saturated fats for which butter was so demonized in the 1950s are actually responsible for its greatest benefits. For example, studies have shown that the short- and medium-chain fatty acids found in butter can raise beneficial HDL cholesterol, lower the risk of a stroke and even contribute toward weight loss. Moreover, reviews have found that there is no association between saturated fat and the risk of heart disease. (1)

Good source of butyrate -- Butter is comprised of between 3 and 4 percent butyrate, a four-carbon fatty acid whose name is actually derived from butter. According to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2013, butyrate can help control the release of pro-inflammatory messages in the body, which reduces inflammation and prevents the immune system from attacking beneficial stomach bacteria. (2) For this reason, butyrate-rich foods like butter can help protect us from chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease, colitis and leaky gut syndrome.

High in conjugated linoleic acid -- Butter is also rich in another fatty acid that deserves special mention: conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). CLA, which is usually found in food products from grass-fed ruminants, is so beneficial to us that it is actually sold as an individual health supplement. One study published in the Journal of Nutrition, for instance, discovered that CLA could reduce body fat mass in overweight and obese humans. (3) Additionally, a review featured in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition noted that CLA mixtures could improve glucose tolerance and increase the blood lipid profiles of animal subjects. (4)

Packed with vitamin A -- Though butter is not a great source of vitamins and minerals, it does contain surprisingly high amounts of retinol, or preformed vitamin A. In fact, just one ounce (28 grams) of butter supplies us with around 700 international units, or 14 percent of our recommended daily allowance, of the vitamin. (5) An important antioxidant, vitamin A is vital for the health of our eyes, skins, tissues, membranes and teeth, and even plays a role in gene transcription. A deficiency in it increases our risk of numerous medical issues, including impaired vision.

Due to its versatility, butter can complement the health benefits of other foods to which it is added. For example, one of the world's finest sources of vitamin A is sweet potatoes. Adding some butter to sweet potatoes will not only improve their taste but also increase their vitamin A content further. Butter can also help decrease the glycemic load of starchy foods, such as white potatoes or pasta, by reducing the speed at which our bodies metabolize them.

Sources for this article include:

(1) http://authoritynutrition.com

(2) http://www.pnas.org

(3) http://jn.nutrition.org

(4) http://ajcn.nutrition.org

(5) http://nutritiondata.self.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

About the author:
Michael Ravensthorpe is an independent writer whose research interests include nutrition, alternative medicine, and bushcraft. He is the creator of the website, Spiritfoods, through which he promotes the world's healthiest foods.


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Thursday, September 4, 2014

D3 and vitamin K2, and the role they play in our health

D3 and vitamin K2, and the role they play in our health (Beyond Tangy Tangerine 2.0 Peach)


(NaturalNews) Deficiencies in vitamin D3 and K2 are a current epidemic in our society today. There are very serious health problems associated with long-term vitamin D3 and K2 deficiencies. Vitamin D3 and K2 deficiencies will impact the development and stability of the immune system, the skeletal muscle system, the nervous system and the endocrine system.


According to Vitamin D expert Michael Holick, 'We estimate that vitamin D deficiency is the most common medical condition in the world (1).' It is clear that most people are not getting enough healthy sun exposure.

Vitamin D is more hormone than vitamin:

Vitamin D more resembles a hormone than vitamin by function. Hormones are chemical messengers that interact with cell receptors to produce specific biological responses. Calcitriol, the active form of Vitamin D, is arguably the most powerful hormone in the body. It has the ability to activate over 1,000 genes (2) which is roughly 5-10% of the human genome.

There are vitamin D receptors throughout the central nervous system and critical regions of the brain including the hippocampus. Researchers have concluded that vitamin D activates and deactivates enzymes in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid that are involved in nerve growth, synaptic density and neurotransmitter synthesis (3).

Vitamin D3 is also shown to boost glutathione production in the neuronal cells protecting them from damage inflicted by oxidative stress. Vitamin D also helps to modulate the immune system to reduce inflammation throughout the body (4).

Vitamin D3 levels are most often understated. In the medical world, levels below 32 ng/ml are considered sufficient. However, much research has shown this level is only sufficient to prevent the development of rickets but not sufficient enough for optimal function (5). Functional medicine doctors look for ranges between 60-100 ng/ml for optimal vitamin D3 levels.

Vitamin K has unique benefits:

Vitamin K1 is necessary for blood coagulation and is produced by green leafy vegetables. The best sources include kale, spinach & collard greens. This form of vitamin K is required for the formation of anticoagulant factors protein C & S.

Vitamin K2 is necessary to convert a critical bone-building protein called osteocalcin. Osteocalcin is a necessary protein that helps maintain calcium homeostasis in bone tissue. It works with osteoblast cells to build healthy bone tissue. Inadequate K2 inhibits osteocalcin production and reduces calcium flow into bone tissue. This leads to reduced bone mass and a weakened bone matrix (6).

Vitamin K2 is found in fermented grass-fed dairy, fermented soy (natto) and some fermented veggies. Additionally, if one has leaky gut syndrome or bad microbial balance in their gut (dysbiosis) they will be unable to synthesize enough vitamin K2 (7). Most people are not are not getting adequate vitamin K2 levels due to a diet deficient in fermented foods and the above mentioned digestive challenges.

D3 and K2 are critical for healthy calcium metabolism:

Vitamin D3 and K2 play an essential role in calcium uptake into skeletal bone tissue. Several studies have shown a synergistic effect of vitamin K2 and D3 (8). These studies show that this combination enhanced osteocalcin accumulation in bone cells greater than any one of these nutrients alone. This increased osteocalcin formation significantly improved bone mineral density (9).

Vitamin K and vitamin D work to increase a substance called Matrix GLA protein (MGP). This protein protects the blood vessels from calcification by congregating around the elastic fibers of the arterial lining and guarding against calcium crystal deposition (10). Some researchers believe that MGP is the most powerful inhibitor of soft tissue calcification presently known.

Sources for this article include:

1) http://www.nejm.org

2) http://tulane.edu

3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

5) http://cjasn.asnjournals.org

6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

7) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

8) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

9) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

10) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

About the author:
Dr David Jockers is a Maximized Living doctor and owns and operates Exodus Health Center in Kennesaw, Georgia where he specializes in functional nutrition, functional medicine and corrective chiropractic care to get to the underlying cause of major health problems.

His website features great articles on natural health and incredible recipes. He is the author of the best-selling book SuperCharge Your Brain - the complete guide to radically improve your mood, memory and mindset. He has over 45,000 active followers on his social media and email newsletter and is a big influencer in the Primal Health movement.

Dr. Jockers is also available for long distance consultations and health coaching to help you beat disease and reach your health goals. 

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Thursday, September 4, 2014

Tomatoes lower prostate cancer risk by one-fifth

Tomatoes lower prostate cancer risk by one-fifth



(NaturalNews) In 2014 alone, an estimated 233,000 men will receive a prostate cancer diagnosis, and nearly 30,000 of them will die from the disease. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer among men worldwide, after lung or bronchial cancer, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American men, according to Cancer.org.

Prostate cancer occurs due to a growth in the prostate gland, which is involved in sperm production and transport. When a growth occurs, cells begin to replicate more rapidly. Errors or flaws in the DNA can occur during replication, creating mutated genes.

Inherited DNA only accounts for about 5 to 10 percent of prostate cancer, according to The American Cancer Society, while the remainder of cases most likely occurs due to environmental factors, particularly an increase in certain hormones. Specific endocrine-disrupting compounds increase hormone levels, potentially influencing the development or progression of prostate cancer.

Prostrate cancer is directly linked to endocrine disruptors, such as BPA

Lead, mercury, arsenic, DDT, fire retardants, dioxin and phthalates like bisphenol A (BPA) are just a few examples of endocrine disruptors, also known as "hormone mimickers."

While prostate cancer is treatable, it can often spread aggressively, thus becoming potentially fatal. Interestingly, prostate cancer rates among men are higher in developed countries, leading some experts to suggest that Western culture could be a factor, particularly diet and lifestyle.

To test this theory, researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Cambridge and Oxford examined the diets and lifestyles of more than 1,800 men ages 50-69 with prostate cancer and compared them to over 12,000 cancer-free men.

Published in the medical journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, the study is the first to catalog a prostate cancer "dietary index." The index linked the dietary components selenium, calcium and lycopene-rich foods, to reduced prostate cancer incidence, according to the University of Bristol.

Foods rich in lycopene reduce the risk of prostrate cancer

Men that consumed an "optimal" amount of the above three dietary components had a lower risk of prostate cancer. Lycopene is the red pigment that gives many fruits and vegetables their red color. It's an antioxidant responsible for fighting toxins known to cause DNA and cellular damage.

Foods rich in lycopene include tomatoes, watermelon, grapefruit, asparagus, chicken, red cabbage, carrots and parsley.

According to the study, tomatoes and tomato juice, as well as baked beans, produced the greatest health benefits, providing an 18 percent risk reduction in men eating more than 10 portions per week.

"Our findings suggest that tomatoes may be important in prostate cancer prevention. However, further studies need to be conducted to confirm our findings, especially through human trials," said Vanessa Er, a researcher with the School of Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol and Bristol Nutrition BRU.

"Men should still eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, maintain a healthy weight and stay active," she added.

Recommendations on physical activity and body weight by cancer prevention institutions were also examined during the study; however, only tips about which foods to eat played a factor in reducing the risk for prostate cancer.

Researches concluded that the recommendations provided by the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research were insufficient, suggesting that additional dietary recommendations should be developed.

The research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and was carried out as part of the ProtecT study, which is funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment program, which aims to develop the best treatment methods for prostate cancer.

Currently, experts are unsure whether operation, radiotherapy or careful monitoring including regular checkups is the best treatment method for prostate cancer.

Additional sources:

http://www.bristol.ac.uk

http://www.bris.ac.uk

http://www.cancer.gov

http://www.nbcnews.com

http://www.cancer.org

http://www.cdc.gov

http://www.cancer.org

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://www.ewg.org

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Thursday, September 4, 2014

Newest study reinforces the prostate-cancer fighting abilities of a tomato-rich diet

Newest study reinforces the prostate-cancer fighting abilities of a tomato-rich diet
 
Friday, August 29, 2014 by: Raw Michelle



(NaturalNews) While it's important to eat a range of fruits and vegetables to help maintain overall health, a recent study has found that tomato consumption is particularly ideal for men wishing to reduce their risk of prostate cancer.(1)

The study, led by researchers at the University of Bristol, divided men aged 50-69 years into two groups; one that was diagnosed with prostate cancer and another that was cancer-free. Diets focusing on cancer-preventing components such as calcium, selenium, and lycopene were provided to the participants and ultimately, it was discovered that of the three, the most beneficial was tomato and tomato juice, which is high in the antioxidant lycopene.(1) In fact, the researchers noted that 10 portions of tomato weekly lowered prostate cancer risk by 18 percent.(1)

Vanessa Er, who led the research, says, "Our findings suggest that tomatoes may be important in prostate cancer prevention."(1)

Tomatoes a health food superstar

The findings reinforce other mentions that tout the benefits of tomatoes, which range from everything from helping with cardiovascular support to improving bone health and even reducing neurological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.(2)

According to the World's Healthiest Foods web site, tomatoes' lycopene is a large factor behind such positive health outcomes, however, the site also states that a phytonutrient in tomatoes called alpha-tomatine is linked to the death of prostate cancer cells -- even ones that have been formed fully.(2)

Tomatoes, especially when eaten together with broccoli, have been referred to as a top cancer-fighting superfood, along with other cancer-combating choices like green tea and curcumin (found in turmeric).(3)

Prostate cancer, which typically occurs in older men, is estimated to lead to nearly 30,000 deaths in the United States in 2014 and 233,000 new cases for the same year.(4)

Prostate screenings are advised and in the event of a cancerous finding, treatments such as chemotherapy are common suggested.(4) However, there are some instances in which people have shunned such treatments in favor of a raw food diet and other lifestyle changes, as is the case of one man by the name of Joshua Strayer who healed his Stage 3 prostate and colon cancers in such a manner.(5)

Sources for this article include:

(1) http://www.scienceworldreport.com

(2) http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=44

(3) http://www.naturalnews.com

(4) http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/prostate

(5) http://www.naturalnews.com/046231_raw_food_diet_cancer_disease.html

About the author:
Raw Michelle is a natural health blogger and researcher, sharing her passions with others, using the Internet as her medium. She discusses topics in a straight forward way in hopes to help people from all walks of life achieve optimal health and well-being. She has authored and published hundreds of articles on topics such as the raw food diet and green living in general


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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

The Role of Vitamin D in Preventing Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

The Role of Vitamin D in Preventing Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

Over the years, we’ve heard how important Vitamin D is preventing diseases, helping with a variety of bodily functions, such as calcium uptake and maintaining an overall healthy immune system. Low levels of Vitamin D have been linked to heart disease, diabetes, and even cancer and it’s estimated that three-quarters of teens and adults in the U.S. are Vitamin D deficient.1 On top of which, a new study has found that Vitamin D deficiency has now been linked to significantly increasing your risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s.

 

This new study, linking low levels of Vitamin D to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, looked at the blood levels of Vitamin D in over 1,600 participants over a 5-6 year period. Participants were over the age of 65 and at the time did not have dementia, cardiovascular disease, or any history of stroke. When participants were brought back for a follow-up after 5 to 6 years, it was found that 171 participants had developed dementia and 102 participants had developed Alzheimer’s. What was established was that low levels of Vitamin D in the blood increased your risk of developing dementia by 53%, and those with severely low levels of Vitamin D, had a 125% risk of developing dementia. As for Alzheimer’s disease, low levels of Vitamin D in the blood increased your risk by 70%, and severely low levels of Vitamin D increased your risk by 120%.2

 

While these findings don’t necessarily tell us what Vitamin D supplementation could mean terms of the preventing health conditions such as dementia and Alzheimer’s, understanding the importance of adequate levels of Vitamin D in your blood is crucial. According to the Institute of Medicine, the amount of daily Vitamin D is:

 

  • 600 IU for everyone ages 1 to 70
  • 800 IU for adults 71 and older

Although you can get Vitamin D from direct sunlight and many food products, most children and adults still will require supplements in order get the daily recommend amounts. Youngevity’s Citri-D™ Vitamin D3 Spray is a highly effective way for adults to get adequate amounts of Vitamin D. Additionally, the new KidSprinklz™ Watermelon Mist, a multi-vitamin supplement power for kids that will be available soon, will provide kids with their daily dose of Vitamin D, plus many other vitamins and probiotics to help keep them healthy.

 

Vitamin D is not only one of Doc’s essential nutrients needed for optimal health, but having the adequate amounts of Vitamin D could help reduce your risk for many diseases.

 

Make sure you are always equipped with some Vitamin D! Prevention is the key!

 

 

Rocio Ramos
Contributing Writer
Youngevity Marketing Team

 


SOURCE:
1 http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/vitamin-d-deficiency-united-states/
2 http://www.nutraingredients.com/Research/Vitamin-D-deficiency-could-double-dementia-risk?nocount

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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Resveratrol Supplementation Could Lead to Improved Memory Function!

Resveratrol Supplementation Could Lead to Improved Memory Function! (Cell Shield RTQ)

 

 

For many years, Resveratrol has been praised and the topic of many nutritional headlines for its high antioxidants properties. It’s been suggested that Resveratrol could help protect the body against aging and many diseases; including heart disease, diabetes, and even obesity. While most of the studies conducted on the health benefits associated with the consumption of Resveratrol have mostly been conducted on test tubes and mice, a new research conducted using men and women has found that Resveratrol supplements have the potential to improve memory function in older individuals.

 

A recent study published in the Journal of Neuroscience stated that daily supplements containing Resveratrol may boost memory performance in association with improved glucose metabolism in older adults and increased functional connectivity of the hippocampus.1 There has already been other research conducted on the potential brain health benefits (such as boosting blood flow to the brain) associated with consuming Resveratrol, however, most of these studies didn’t dive into how it affected the actual cognitive performance of the brain; until now.

 

This new study randomly assigned 46 men and women, from the age of 50 to 75, to either receive a 200 mg daily dose of Resveratrol or a placebo. After 26 weeks, the participants were asked to take a series of memory tests and neuroimaging – techniques that image the structure and function of the brain. The results were compelling, showing significant improvement in word retention compared to the placebo group, decreased levels of hemoglobin – an indicator of excessive glucose in the blood – and a substantial increase in hippocampal functional connectivity – the hippocampus in the brain helps with memory forming, organizing and storing. These results gave scientists much to consider on the potential of Resveratrol supplementation; with more studies to be conducted soon.

 

Although for years, Resveratrol has been highlighted for its cardiovascular health benefits and anti-aging compounds, even thought to be responsible for the French paradox, the true potential of Resveratrol seems yet to be discovered. There is still so much more to learn about this powerful antioxidant and boosting one’s memory wouldn’t be a bad side effect. If you are looking to add a bit of Resveratrol into your diet, start with some Cell Shield RTQ™ which not only contains 200 mg of Resveratrol but also includes two other powerful antioxidants; Quercetin Dihydrate and Turmeric Root.

 

Start boosting your memory! Remember, prevention is the key!

 

 

Rocio Ramos
Contributing Writer
Youngevity Marketing Team

 


SOURCE:
1 http://www.nutraingredients.com/Research/Resveratrol-supplements-may-improve-memory-performance-in-older-adults-Study

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Sunday, August 24, 2014

Eating more of these 5 foods can help improve your eye health

Eating more of these 5 foods can help improve your eye health



(NaturalNews) Vision is one of mankind's most valued senses. Unfortunately, for many it's susceptible to extremely degenerative conditions. In the United States alone, nearly $7 billion is spent to treat cataracts, affecting about 22 million Americans over the age of 40.

Approximately 75 percent of adults require some sort of corrective lenses, according to the Vision Council of America, and about 64 percent wear eyeglasses, with the other 11 percent wearing contact lenses.

About a third of the population suffers from near-sightedness, while about 60 percent are far-sighted, struggling to see up close.

It's safe to say this country has a vision problem, and other than consuming a healthy diet, no preventive methods have been developed. We live during an age of heart transplants, yet there's no technology that preserves one of our most important traits, eyesight.

Fortunately, a healthy diet is pretty powerful. Consuming certain foods has proven to directly impact vision and overall eye health.

Below are five top foods for tackling degenerative vision.

1. Egg Yolks

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss for people over 65 years old; however, eating egg yolks can help slow this process. For various reasons, a degenerative process can affect the macula, a tiny area in the back of the eye, subsequently damaging your vision.

Egg yolks contain lutein, a yellow-pigmented antioxidant belonging to a class of compounds called carotenoids. Lutein and a similar compound called zeaxanthin selectively accumulate in the macula of the retina, scavenging free radicals and acting as a blue-light filter.

Some experts suggest that we need about 6 mg of these antioxidants a day. One egg yolk has about 0.25 mg of lutein, and even more if you don't cook it. Also, the body absorbs lutein found in egg yolks more easily than it does that found in fruits or vegetables. Consuming lutein with olive or coconut oil enhances absorption.

While other foods contribute to eye health, egg yolks were found to help the most


2. Spinach

This delicious, green leafy vegetable contains lots of lutein, therefore working miracles on the eyes. Consuming it raw is the best method, as heating spinach is known to damage some of its antioxidants.

In the macula, lutein and zeaxanthin are considered macular pigments. Macular pigments have been shown to decrease the risk of AMD, and might also play a role in age-related cataracts, according to the Egg Nutrition Center [PDF]. Among carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin are the only ones to be found in the eye's lens.

Kale, broccoli, romaine lettuce, peas, Brussels sprouts, zucchini and other collard greens also contain high amounts of lutein.

3. Blueberries

Blueberries, also referred to as "brainberries," are considered by some to be the healthiest food on the planet. Their bright blue casings contain anthocyanins, a group of powerful antioxidants that aid the body with multiple protections.

Eating blueberries helps protect the retina from unwanted sunlight and oxygen damage.

4. Carrots

While consuming carrots won't necessarily reverse bad eyesight, they can help improve overall eye health. Carrots contain lutein and beta-carotene, a substance converted to vitamin A by the body, a beneficial nutrient for eye health. Vitamin A is a crucial nutrient; in fact, a lack of it is the leading cause of blindness in the developing world, according to HowStuffWorks.com.

Orange0colored foods like mango, pumpkin, apricots, sweet potatoes and cantaloupe also contain beta-carotene.

5. Almonds

This vitamin E-rich nut has also been proven to slow macular degeneration, and just one handful a day provides you about half of your daily dose, according to Health.com. Almonds contain the anti-cancer nutrient amygdalin, also known as laetrile or vitamin B17.

Almonds promote overall well-being. They contribute to weight loss, help lower cholesterol, prevent heart disease and improve your complexion, among many other benefits.

Additional sources:

http://glassescrafter.com

http://www.aao.org [PDF]

http://www.counselheal.com

http://health.howstuffworks.com

http://www.eggnutritioncenter.org [PDF]

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.health.com

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Thursday, August 21, 2014

Omega-3s boost brain health by improving neuron cell membrane functionality

Omega-3s boost brain health by improving neuron cell membrane functionality



(NaturalNews) Most Americans have an omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid imbalance due to the prevalence of unsaturated omega-6 fatty acids from polyunsaturated processed oils in processed foods.

It should minimally be three to one omega-6 to omega-3, while one to one is considered ideal by experts. But it's estimated that many SAD (standard American diet) consumers are at around 20 to 1 omega-6 to omega-3 or worse.

This imbalance creates chronic inflammation that invites obesity and even more serious autoimmune diseases. Omega-3 fatty acids from eggs, whole organic raw milk, and meat and fish from healthy sources provide instantly usable omega-3 fatty acids that are important for heart health and optimal brain function, despite medical dogma and "common knowledge" to the contrary.

Plant-based polyunsaturated seeds or oils, such as flax oils or ground seeds, hemp oils or seeds and chia seeds, do provide additional health benefits and elements of usable omega-3.

But the process of converting plant based ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) into usable omega-3 as EPA and DHA is less efficient among diabetics and wanes as we grow older.

EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) are already formed for us by fish and animal sources, and they are very supportive of heart and brain health and reduce rheumatoid arthritis issues. [1]

But it would be wise to balance those out with plant sources as well, since they offer other nutritional advantages that we all need. Omega-3s have provided amazing results for brain protection and restoration in animal studies and in real-life human brain damage recoveries.

Animal (in vivo) and lab (in vitro) studies

A study comparing mice with omega-3-rich diets to those without was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine's Department of Neurology and published in the journal Stroke.

The researchers determined that omega-3s in brain-damaged mice brought about brain-damage repair and neuroprotection by suppressing an inflammatory process. [2]

The exact mechanics of this neuroprotection and reconstruction were explored more recently in 2014. Three Paris universities collaborated on in vitro (lab cultures) studies using high magnification.

That study proved that the presence of omega-3 lipids makes the brain cell membranes more malleable and therefore more sensitive to deformation and fission by proteins.

This might seem like a bad thing, but malleability, deformation and fission are elements of endocytosis, a vital function enabling brain cells' membranes to transport hormones and nutrients and provide efficient neurotransmitter pathways for optimum brain function.

The study results were published in the journal Science on August 8, 2014. [3] [4]

And now for something more dramatic

In Virginia a couple of years ago, a high school teenager whose brain was so damaged in a car accident that his parents were informed that he would be vegetative for the rest of his life if he ever came out of his coma while on life support.

The teen's dad refused to give up. An old Army buddy, now MD, told him about a recent similar case in neighboring West Virginia where a 26-year-old man brain-damaged and in a coma was flirting with death after a coal-mining accident. He was treated with high-dose fish oil through his feeding tube, 20 grams a day. One gram a day is considered normal supplementation, with three grams a day the limit. [1]

The West Virginia hospital's neurosurgeon knew omega-3s were an important part of brain cell structures. He courageously broke the boundaries of the American Medical Association's "standard of care" and helped the young coal miner walk out of the hospital just three months after the mining accident.

The Virginia hospital didn't have that courageous neurosurgeon, so the teenage boy's father's efforts to convince the hospital to duplicate that West Virginia neurosurgeon's protocol on his own son was an uphill drama.

But he ultimately succeeded with getting the hospital to duplicate that mega-dose fish oil feeding protocol to restore his son's ability to walk and even formally address his high school classmates on graduation day. [5]

Sources for this article include:

[1] http://umm.edu

[2]http://science.naturalnews.com

[3] http://www2.cnrs.fr [PDF]

[4] http://www.sciencedaily.com

[5] http://www.naturalnews.com


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Thursday, August 21, 2014

Following 5 simple daily habits can help you boost your metabolism and lose weight

Following 5 simple daily habits can help you boost your metabolism and lose weight



(NaturalNews) When it comes to weight loss, nearly everyone is looking for a quick fix. Many of us live complicated lives filled with stresses originating from all angles. Unfortunately, Western society normalizes the constant flow of activities, distractions and pressures, tricking us into feeling like we should be capable of juggling it all, but it's really not the intended way for humans to live.

Performance at work, meeting your bills, taking care of your family, making time for friends and maintaining a healthy weight and diet are just a few of the everyday expectations many of us are pressured to achieve. Weight loss might rank towards the top for many, but creating time for daily exercise can be a daunting task.

It's easy to make excuses, number one being fatigue, not to exercise after a long day at work. We've all been there.

Fortunately, there are ways to boost your metabolism naturally, helping your body perform optimally when you do find time to get your heart pumping.

Some of them you're probably already practicing and, luckily, you likely enjoy; however, directing your awareness to them will make these five simple daily habits much more effective.

1. Consuming multiple meals throughout the day
This first one is classic, and quite enjoyable. Eating several small, healthy meals during the day keeps your metabolism running at its optimal level, and of course, breakfast is the most important one.

Your metabolism, or metabolic rate, controls basic functions like your heartbeat, breathing and thinking

Many of us are guilty of skipping breakfast, and guilty you should feel, because enjoying a good breakfast first thing in the morning kick-starts the fat-burning process. After eight hours of sleep, your body is starved. Satisfying this hunger helps curb unhealthy cravings before lunchtime, and can increase your metabolism by up to 10 percent, according to the Norris Cotton Cancer Center.

2. Laughter
Just like they say, "laughter is the best medicine," and when it comes to weight loss, it's no exception.

However, this medicine only works under one condition: the laughter has to be genuine. According to the Department of Medicine at Vanderbilt University, just 10 to 15 minutes of genuine laughter a day helps boost your heart rate, and therefore your metabolism.

So find someone or something that makes you laugh, and have a great time.

3. Green Tea
Several studies have shown that drinking green tea helps support weight loss by reducing your appetite and increasing your metabolism. The caffeine in green tea makes this possible. A 2007 report from the American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology found that green tea may also inhibit the effects of catechol-O-methyltransferase, an enzyme that triggers the breakdown of brain chemicals involved in regulating appetite.

4. Spicy Foods
Eating spicy foods helps raise your body temperature and triggers the sympathetic nervous system, allowing your body to produce sweat and burn calories. Capsaicin, the active ingredient in chili peppers, can increase your metabolism by 20 percent and reduces your energy intake, which aids weight loss. Your metabolism works faster for up to 30 minutes after eating spicy foods.

5. Walking for 5 minutes
Walking or jogging in place for just five minutes helps boost your metabolism, and the more effort you put in, the faster it works. "Walking increases the demand for energy, which actually increases your metabolism," according to Medical Daily. The farther you walk, the longer your metabolism functions at a higher level.

Start practicing your five daily weight loss habits today, and enjoy a healthier lifestyle and a smaller waistline.

Additional sources:

http://altmedicine.about.com

http://www.medicaldaily.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Thursday, August 21, 2014

Excellent natural calcium sources for bone health

Excellent natural calcium sources for bone health



(NaturalNews) Calcium is an essential macromineral whose roles in the body are relatively well-known. It strengthens bones and teeth, improves the body's alkalinity, helps our heart muscles to contract and relax properly and more.

Like all minerals, calcium doesn't work alone, but in tandem with other nutrients such as magnesium and vitamin D. For this reason, obtaining our calcium from whole foods -- foods whose nutrient profiles have been optimized by nature for superior absorption -- is the best way to remain healthy.

Good natural sources of calcium

Seaweed -- It is common to find seaweed in any "best of" list, and for good reason: since seaweed grows in the ocean and is thus unaffected by soil erosion (the process that has significantly reduced the nutritional value of most land-based vegetables), its nutritiousness has remained intact for centuries. And, as it happens, seaweed has always been rich in calcium.

Perhaps the best seaweeds in this regard are kelp, kombu and wakame. One hundred grams of each contain between 150 and 170 milligrams of calcium, as well as countless other essential nutrients, including iodine. Avoiding seaweed sourced from the Pacific Ocean is a good idea due to possible radiation contamination.

Chia seeds -- Though chia seeds are best-known for their high protein and fiber content, they contain similarly impressive levels of calcium. In fact, 1 ounce of these versatile South American seeds provides us with 179 milligrams of calcium, which is 17 percent of our recommended daily allowance (RDA). Of course, it's easy to consume far more than 1 ounce of chia seeds per day, making them one of the easiest foods to consume for correcting a calcium deficiency.

Blackstrap molasses -- Blackstrap molasses is the dark, treacle-like byproduct of the sugar cane refinement process. Since it is derived from the sugar cane plant, whose tall roots grow deep into the soil, it contains a large number of nutrients that are seldom found in such quantities elsewhere, including calcium. Specifically, 1 tablespoon of blackstrap supplies us with 123 milligrams of the mineral, or 12 percent of our RDA. Blackstrap is also a good source of magnesium, manganese, selenium, potassium and iron, and makes a great sweetener in baking.

Sesame seeds -- These nutty and delicate seeds, which belong to one of the oldest oilseed crops grown on Earth, supply our bodies with 88 milligrams of calcium per tablespoon. Like chia seeds, sesame seeds are incredibly versatile and can be sprinkled on salads and cooked meals, or simply eaten as a snack.

Raw milk -- According to the Weston A. Price Foundation, 8 ounces of raw milk -- unprocessed milk straight from the cow -- supplies our bodies with 300 milligrams of calcium. Additionally, it contains certain minerals, such as phosphorus and magnesium, which aid the calcium's absorption rate. Unfortunately, milk subjected to homogenization and/or pasteurization does not fare as well. These unnatural processes damage the nutritional structure of the milk, and inhibit the absorption rate of its nutrients.

Incidentally, this fact also applies to other dairy products. Yogurt, cheese and kefir are all excellent sources of calcium when made from raw milk. When made using processed milk, however, their nutrient profile is compromised.

Certain leafy greens -- Due to soil erosion, most green vegetables -- once considered among the finest sources of calcium -- are now shadows of their former selves nutrition-wise. Fortunately, a number of hardy greens do retain some of their nutritional power. Kale is probably the best example of these (1 cup of chopped kale contains 101 milligrams of calcium), with broccoli and spinach in second and third place respectably.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.whfoods.com

http://ndb.nal.usda.gov

http://nutritiondata.self.com

http://www.realmilk.com

http://www.westonaprice.org

http://science.naturalnews.com

About the author:
Michael Ravensthorpe is an independent writer whose research interests include nutrition, alternative medicine, and bushcraft. He is the creator of the website, Spiritfoods, through which he promotes the world's healthiest foods.


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Thursday, August 21, 2014

Vitamin D deficiency more than doubles risk of Alzheimer's, dementia

Vitamin D deficiency more than doubles risk of Alzheimer's, dementia



(NaturalNews) The most comprehensive study yet to be conducted on the subject has revealed that vitamin D levels really do affect dementia risk. An expert, multidisciplinary team of researchers hailing from some of the best schools in the world found that elderly folks severely lacking in vitamin D are more than twice as likely as other adults with normal or optimal vitamin D levels to develop Alzheimer's disease or other similar forms of mental illness.

Published in the peer-reviewed journal Neurology, the study involved looking at 1,658 adults aged 65 years or older. All of the participants were healthy at the beginning of the study, able to walk without a walker and free of heart disease. Researchers tracked all of them for six years, paying close attention to those who developed some form of dementia and comparing vitamin D levels across the board.

What they found was a strong association between low vitamin D levels and elevated risk of dementia. Among those who were moderately deficient in vitamin D, for instance, a 53 percent increased risk of general dementia was observed. And specifically for Alzheimer's, those with moderate vitamin D deficiency were found to be 69 percent more likely to develop the condition than others were.

The risk was even higher for those with vitamin D levels in the "severely deficient" range, which is somewhere between 25 and 50 nanomoles per liter (nmol/L) of vitamin D. For Alzheimer's, the risk was 122 percent higher among those with a severe deficiency. And for general dementia, the risk was a whopping 125 percent.

The researchers involved had expected to observe some correlation between low vitamin D levels and dementia. But they admit that they were unprepared for the drastic variance they observed, which serves as a wakeup call for the millions of aging "baby boomers" who already have an elevated risk of mental illness.

"We expected to find an association between low Vitamin D levels and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, but the results were surprising -- we actually found that the association was twice as strong as we anticipated," stated Dr. David Llewellyn from the University of Exeter Medical School, one of the study's authors.

Elderly folks need to get more sunlight, take vitamin D3 supplements to avoid disease

The results are hardly surprising when considering the vast benefits already associated with vitamin D intake, however. The Vitamin D Council outlines more than 40 health conditions that modern science has identified as being associated with low vitamin D levels, which is easily correctable through increased sunlight exposure and supplementation.

"Clinical trials are now needed to establish whether eating foods such as oily fish or taking vitamin D supplements can delay or even prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease and dementia," added Dr. Llewellyn. "Our findings are very encouraging, and even if a small number of people could benefit, this would have enormous public health implications given the devastating and costly nature of dementia."

While the authors stopped short of actually recommending vitamin D supplementation and increased sunlight exposure as an effective prevention method, Dr. Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at the Alzheimer's Society, suggests otherwise.

"During this hottest of summers, hitting the beach for just 15 minutes of sunshine is enough to boost your vitamin D levels," he is quoted as saying by the University of Exeter.

Since there is no adverse risk involved, why not bring your vitamin D levels into optimal range?

Sources for this article include:

http://www.exeter.ac.uk

http://www.scienceworldreport.com

http://www.eurekalert.org

http://www.scienceworldreport.com

https://www.vitamindcouncil.org

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Thursday, August 7, 2014

The importance of CoQ10 levels in human health

The importance of CoQ10 levels in human health (Beyond Tangy Tangerine 2.0)



(NaturalNews) True health begins at the cellular level and our body contains roughly 75 trillion cells. The mitochondria is the key organelle within the cell that produces the majority of the energy. Coenzyme Q10 is a vital enzyme anti-oxidant within the mitochondria that is commonly deficient in many individuals.

Coenzyme Q10 is an anti-oxidant enzyme within the mitochondria. This anti-oxidant regenerates other antioxidants such as vitamin E. Its major role is helping the mitochondria harvest energy producing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from the foods we eat. More than 75% of our energy is produced through the use of CoQ10 (1).

Symptoms of low CoQ10:

Chronic fatigue
Fibromyalgia
Forgetfulness
Alzheimer's disease
Dementia
Parkinson's disease
Heart disease
Hypertension
Muscle/joint pain
Mental sluggishness
Depression
Irritability
Headaches/migraines
Low immunity

Losing CoEnzyme Q10:

There are two major factors that lead to deficiency ofCoQ10 in human beings:
1. Reduced biosynthesis
2. Increased Utilization by the body.

Biosynthesis is the major source of CoQ10. Biosynthesis requires at least 12 genes and mutations in many of them cause CoQ10 deficiency. A few other genetic defects such as mutations of mitochondrial DNA can also influence. Some chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, etc., may also reduce the biosynthesis and increase the demand for CoQ10 in the body (2).

Poor lifestyle habits such as a diet rich in sugar and processed foods, smoking, poor sleeping habits, sedentary habits or overtraining all increase coQ10 utilization and thus deplete coQ10 levels. Chronic infections, environmental toxicity and high amounts of emotional stress all deplete coQ10 levels as well.

Aging and statin medication usage on CoQ10 levels:

CoQ10 is found in every cell of the body but is present in higher concentrations in organs that have higher energy requirements such as the kidneys, liver and heart. As we age, we lose our supply of CoQ10, particularly in the heart. By the time we are 80 years old our CoQ10 production is said to be about half of a 20 year olds. CoQ10 plays a huge role in energy supply in the heart and the vascular walls (3).

The most popularly prescribed cholesterol lowering medications, statins, have been shown to lower CoQ10 production by up to 40% (4). Unfortunately, many physicians remain unaware of this and they continue to prescribe statin cholesterol lowering medications without supplementing with CoQ10.

Low CoQ10 and chronic disease:

Cancer patients have been found to have low CoQ10 levels. This limits their ability to prevent against oxidative stress targeted at their DNA which leads to altered cellular function and abnormal cell development. CoQ10 supplementation has also been shown to be effective at slowing cancer growth and preventing its development (5, 6, 7).

CoQ10 has also been shown to improve brain health and reduce the severity and frequency of migraine headaches. Additionally, low CoQ10 is linked to degenerative neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's, dementia and Parkinson's. Supplemental coQ10 has been shown to strengthen the neuronal cell mitochondria and be a potent defense against neurological degeneration (8, 9).

Major studies have demonstrated that CoQ10 reduced oxidation and DNA double-strand breaks. This means that CoQ10 powerfully reduces stress on our DNA which is a key factor for anti-aging. It protects against damage to the arterial lining and keeps blood vessels strong and supple (10).

Best food sources of CoQ10:

The best food sources of CoQ10 are organ meats such as liver, heart and kidney. Wild-caught fish, grass-fed beef, wild game such as bison and venison and pastured poultry are all fantastic sources. Plant based sources include nuts, seeds and cruciferous veggies but in far smaller quantities than that found in animal foods.

The typical American diet provides about 10mg of CoQ10 daily. For a young individual with a strong and healthy digestive system this could be enough to supply their needs. As we age, our digestive system often gets compromised and we become very deficient in this key nutrient. This is when supplementation is necessary.

Sources for this article include:
1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3178961/
2) http://medind.nic.in/jac/t13/i1/jact13i1p37.pdf
3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24389208
4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3096178/
5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23477030
6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23274416
7) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16443053
8) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9671775
9) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21799249
10) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3465845/
11) http://www.naturalnews.com

About the author:
Dr David Jockers is a Maximized Living doctor and owns and operates Exodus Health Center in Kennesaw, Georgia where he specializes in functional nutrition, functional medicine and corrective chiropractic care to get to the underlying cause of major health problems.

His website features great articles on natural health and incredible recipes. He is the author of the best-selling book SuperCharge Your Brain - the complete guide to radically improve your mood, memory and mindset. He has over 45,000 active followers on his social media and email newsletter and is a big influencer in the Primal Health movement.



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Thursday, August 7, 2014

Study finds curcumin, the main polyphenol in turmeric, as effective as Prozac in treating depression

Study finds curcumin, the main polyphenol in turmeric, as effective as Prozac in treating depression (Cell Shield RTQ)

 

(NaturalNews) A recent study published in Phytotherapy Research shows that curcumin, the main polyphenol in turmeric, is as at least as effective as fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating depression. (1)

Not only can it help ease symptoms of depression, but it does so safely, without the potential to cause suicidal thoughts, weight gain and even changes in blood pressure and heart rate that can lead to shock and death -- some of the many side effects which have been linked to Prozac. (2)

The study, conducted by researchers from the Department of Pharmacology at the Government Medical College in Bhavnagar, India, assessed groups of people who took curcumin capsules and Prozac, either individually or combined. (1) Twenty people took 500 mg curcumin capsules twice daily, 20 took 20 mg of Prozac daily, and the remaining 20 people took a combination of the two. (3) The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, a questionnaire designed to gauge the severity of a person's depression level, was given to assess any changes in mood among the individuals who participated in this study.

The importance of turning to natural methods instead of prescribed drugs

The findings showed that curcumin worked just as well as Prozac, acting as the "first clinical evidence that curcumin may be used as an effective and safe modality for treatment in patients with MDD without concurrent suicidal ideation or other psychotic disorders." (1, 3) MDD stands for "Major Depressive Disorder."

Although experts are quick to point out that such findings are preliminary and are not meant to necessarily become a substitute for drugs approved by the FDA, many people are hesitant to trust FDA suggestions due to admissions from the agency that negatively impact health. For example, through the years, the FDA has admitted that chicken meat sold in the U.S. contains arsenic, and more recently, has come forward with statements that some acne products can actually be fatal. (4, 5)

Other health benefits of turmeric, plus a healthy turmeric tea recipe

Therefore, turning to natural alternatives to help heal is often a choice made by those seeking to improve or maintain their health. Turmeric, which is a part of the ginger family, has been known to help aid conditions that range from acne and clogged arteries to improving inflammation-related ailments, depression and insomnia. (6)

To enjoy these benefits, a tea made with curcumin can help. By boiling 1/4 cup of grated fresh turmeric root (or 1 tablespoon ground turmeric) with 2 tablespoons of grated fresh ginger root in 4 cups of water, a healthy turmeric tea that serves four people can easily be prepared. (6) Add lemon or a natural sweetener if preferred.

Sources for this article include:

(1) http://healthimpactnews.com

(2) http://www.drugwatch.com

(3) http://www.wholefoodsmagazine.com

(4) http://www.naturalnews.com

(5) http://www.naturalnews.com

(6) http://blogs.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

About the author:
A science enthusiast with a keen interest in health nutrition, Antonia has been intensely researching various dieting routines for several years now, weighing their highs and their lows, to bring readers the most interesting info and news in the field. While she is very excited about a high raw diet, she likes to keep a fair and balanced approach towards non-raw methods of food preparation as well.



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Monday, August 4, 2014

75% of Americans are at double the risk of schizophrenia due to vitamin D deficiency

75% of Americans are at double the risk of schizophrenia due to vitamin D deficiency



(NaturalNews) Vitamin D deficiency may double the risk of schizophrenia, according to a study conducted by researchers from Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Iran and published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

According to some estimates, that may mean that 75 percent of the US population is at double the usual risk of schizophrenia!

"When we examined the findings of several observational studies on vitamin D and schizophrenia, we found people with schizophrenia have lower vitamin D levels than healthy people," said researcher Ahmad Esmaillzadeh, PhD. "Vitamin D deficiency is quite common among people with schizophrenia."

"Significant impact"

Schizophrenia is a potentially severe mental illness that can be characterized by delusions and hallucinations. Research has shown that the disease is more common in cold climates and at latitudes far from the equator.

This is a pattern, seen in many diseases, that makes researchers look for a potential connection with vitamin D deficiency.

"This is the first comprehensive meta-analysis to study the relationship between the two conditions," Esmaillzadeh said.

Vitamin D is produced by the skin upon exposure to ultraviolet radiation from sunlight. Farther from the equator, the sun is less strong, and people are at higher risk for vitamin D deficiency. Researchers estimate that 1 billion people worldwide may have insufficient vitamin D levels due to not getting enough exposure to sunlight (unprotected by clothing or sunscreen).

The researchers reviewed the results of 19 prior observational studies conducted on a total of 2,804 people. The researchers found that people with vitamin D deficiency were 2.16 times more likely to be schizophrenic than people with sufficient vitamin D levels. Of schizophrenic participants, 65 percent were vitamin D deficient. On average, schizophrenic participants had vitamin D blood levels 5.91 ng/ml lower than non-schizophrenic participants.

While scientists have long known that vitamin D is critical for bone health and for preventing rickets and osteoporosis, it is only recently that they have begun to discover the role that it plays in preventing other diseases and conditions.

"There is a growing trend in the nutrition science field to consider vitamin D and its relationship to conditions such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease and depression," Esmaillzadeh said. "Our findings support the theory that vitamin D may have a significant impact on psychiatric health. More research is needed to determine how the growing problem of vitamin D deficiency may be affecting our overall health."

How many people are at risk?

Because vitamin D deficiency is so widespread, the new study suggests that vast segments of the U.S. population may be making themselves more vulnerable to schizophrenia by not getting enough sunlight.

One study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine in 2009, estimated that three-quarters of teenagers and adults in the United States are vitamin D deficient. A full 97 percent of African American adults were found to have insufficient levels.

The researchers used 30 ng/ml as the cutoff for sufficient levels.

"We're just starting to scratch the surface of what the health effects of vitamin D are," said researcher Adit Ginde of the University of Colorado at Denver. "There's reason to pay attention for sure."

Because the functions of vitamin D are still poorly understood, researchers remain divided over exactly what blood levels of the vitamin are ideal. However, even people who use a lower standard agree that deficiency is widespread.

For example, Purdue University professor Jim Fleet, who was critical of Ginde's study, said that even using a stricter threshold, 40 percent of African Americans are considered vitamin D deficient.

"If you look at people in the categories that we worry about," he said, "that's still a lot of people."

Sources for this article include:

http://www.endocrine.org

http://www.scientificamerican.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Healthy vitamin D levels help relieve chronic pain

Healthy vitamin D levels help relieve chronic pain


(NaturalNews) Previous studies have proven that maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream increases our emotional well-being, encourages longevity and offers relief to patients suffering from chronic pain.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic concluded that sufficient levels of the sunshine vitamin help alleviate chronic pain, as reported by MayoClinic.org. Michael Turner, M.D., a physical medicine and rehabilitation physician and the study's lead author, discovered a correlation between inadequate vitamin D levels and the amount of pain medication required by patients experiencing chronic pain.

Analysis of patients taking narcotic pain medicine showed that those with lowered levels of vitamin D depended on twice the dosage of medication as those with adequate levels of the sunshine vitamin.

"This is an important finding as we continue to investigate the causes of chronic pain," said Dr. Turner. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chronic pain is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Arthritis is the number one condition responsible for chronic pain, claiming more than 50 million victims annually.

Patients prescribed to narcotics reported having decreased physical functional abilities and a more negative perception of their overall health. Scientists identified another interesting correlation between vitamin D levels and increased body mass index (BMI), which is used to measure obesity. The results were published in the journal Pain Medicine.

Researchers from the D-CarDia collaboration are the first to associate high BMI with low vitamin D levels. Their findings suggest that, as obesity increases, vitamin D levels are reduced.

Links between high BMI and low vitamin D levels were able to be drawn across various demographic groups. A report by Medical News Today stated, "For each 10% increase in BMI there was a 4.2% drop in Vitamin D."

The publication added, "Vitamin D scores appeared to have no link to BMI, indicating that the association between the two is more likely a Vitamin D lowering effect caused by a high BMI."

Maintaining sufficient levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream provides us with a diverse range of health benefits. Dr. Turner affirms that this particular vitamin "is known to promote both bone and muscle strength," by assisting your intestines with absorption of nutrients like calcium and phosphorus.

"Vitamin D provides calcium balance in the body that prevents osteoporosis or arthritis," as reported by Newsmax.

The sunshine vitamin is also crucial in that it decreases your chance of heart disease by providing a protective lining for blood vessels and protects you from getting the flu and colds by activating your immune system, triggering it to attack and destroy bacteria and viruses.

Additional health benefits include blood pressure regulation, stress reduction, alleviation of body aches and muscle spasms, helping fight depression, improved overall skin health and reduced wrinkles given the correct level of exposure.

Dr. Turner illustrated that "deficiency is an under-recognized source of diffuse pain and impaired neuromuscular functioning. By recognizing it, physicians can significantly improve their patients' pain, function and quality of life."

Obtaining proper levels of vitamin D naturally depends on a variety of factors like air pollution, altitude levels, the weather and sunscreen. Humans produce levels of the vitamin differently depending on their skin tone. Pale skin absorbs sunlight faster requiring about 15 minutes of direct sunlight. Those with darker skin tones could need up to two hours to achieve optimal vitamin D levels.

Foods like salmon, sardines, egg yolks, shrimp and milk offer vitamin D, but getting enough of the mineral solely through foods is difficult. If you're reluctant about sun exposure, vitamin D supplements can get your levels to where they need to be.

Additional sources:

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org

http://www.cdc.gov

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com

http://www.newsmax.com


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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

An introduction to potassium and why it is essential for our bodies

An introduction to potassium and why it is essential for our bodies


(NaturalNews) Potassium is an essential mineral whose ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells. It accumulates in plant cells, meaning that many fresh vegetables and fruits -- most famously bananas -- are rich in it. Dissolved potassium is also found in sea vegetables such as kelp, bladderwrack and kombu, since seawater is approximately 0.04 percent potassium by weight.

While most people are aware on some level that potassium is important, few people really understand what it does for us. This article takes a closer look at the roles of potassium in our bodies and reveals how much of it our bodies need per day to function properly.

The four main roles of potassium

Regulates water balance -- One of potassium's biggest roles in our bodies is to regulate the amount of sodium entering and exiting our cells, thereby controlling the amount of fluid we retain or excrete. This maintains the body's pH levels, which ensures that our cellular processes proceed at an appropriate rate. People who are deficient in potassium often suffer from fluid retention, which can cause edema, an unpleasant condition that leads to swelling and water-related weight gain.

Aids biochemical processes -- Potassium plays an important role in energy metabolism and cellular biochemical reactions. It helps us synthesize protein from amino acids in cells (thus helping us to grow muscle and build cells), and also helps us convert glucose to glycogen for storage in the liver as a future supply of energy. For these reasons, potassium-rich foods tend to be a popular choice with bodybuilders and athletes.

Maintains electrolyte and acid-base balance -- Potassium is a positively charged electrolyte, and its presence (or absence) directly affects the actions of other electrolytes such as calcium or sodium in our bodies. For example, a deficiency in potassium and an excess in calcium can result in kidney stones, since calcium ions -- without being balanced by potassium ions -- can be excreted by our kidneys into our urine. Moreover, potassium ions bind themselves to negatively charged bicarbonate ions, which creates a buffer that regulates our bodies' acid-base balance. A body with an acidic pH is, of course, a breeding ground for disease.

Boosts nervous system function -- Our bodies use potassium ions to conduct electrical impulses along muscle and nerve cells. These impulses -- which are essentially electrical currents -- are what keep the heart pumping and the muscles contracting. Without potassium (and other minerals such as calcium and sodium), we could not transport signals from our nervous systems to elsewhere in our bodies, resulting in irregular heartbeats and heart arrhythmias. For this reason, potassium is also needed for a healthy cardiovascular system.

How much potassium do we need?

The recommended daily allowance of potassium for adult men and women (including pregnant women) is 4,700 milligrams per day, while children need 4,500 milligrams of it per day. Though potassium deficiencies are not as widespread as magnesium or iodine deficiencies, they are becoming more common (especially in the United States) and can result in muscle cramps, loss of appetite, fatigue, weakness and nausea. People who consume a diet rich in organic whole foods, however, usually do not have to worry about a deficiency in potassium since natural produce contains it in abundance.

Sources for this article include:

http://hkpp.org/patients/potassium-health

http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/potassium

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002413.htm

About the author:
Michael Ravensthorpe is an independent writer whose research interests include nutrition, alternative medicine, and bushcraft. He is the creator of the website, Spiritfoods, through which he promotes the world's healthiest foods.



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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Use digestive enzymes to improve your digestion

Use digestive enzymes to improve your digestion (Ultimate Enzymes)

Tuesday, July 22, 2014 by: Dr. David Jockers

 

(NaturalNews) Enzymes are extremely vital to human well-being. They play a critical role in digestion and nutrient assimilation, in immune response, cognitive acceleration and cellular detoxification, among other things. Get a wide variety of digestive enzymes to improve your digestive system.

Enzymes are long-chain proteins that take on specific shapes and act like a key to unique locks throughout the body. Their job is to carry out very specific functions throughout the body. Most of the digestive enzymes are produced by the pancreas and are therefore called pancreatic enzymes.

Enzymes and the digestive process:

Enzymes are extremely important for breaking down carbohydrates, protein and fatty acids and preparing them for proper digestion and assimilation in the body. Individuals with digestive challenges are often unable to produce sufficient quantities of digestive enzymes and are unable to effectively digest the food that they are eating.

Improper digestion causes significantly more stress and inflammation in the gut lining that ultimately leads to the degradation of the mucosal membranes and the complications of leaky gut syndrome. When the mucosal membrane is damaged, it is then unable to secrete the appropriate enzymes, and we end up with a vicious cycle that causes more gut inflammation.

Symptoms of low pancreatic enzymes:

  • Bloating and cramping
  • Diarrhea and constipation
  • Flatulence (gas)
  • Low energy
  • Fatigue after meals
  • Weight gain
  • Food sensitivities
  • Food in stools
  • Nutrient deficiencies

 

Key enzymes for improving digestion:

Some of the key enzymes that break down various carbohydrates and fibers include lactase, maltase, amylase, cellulase, glucoamylase, alpha-galactosidase and sucrase. These enzymes help metabolize various sugars and fibers, which reduces inflammation in the gut and the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).

Amylase:
This is an enzyme produced both in our saliva and by our pancreas and secreted into the small intestine. Amylase helps the body metabolize sugar and starch and turn it into glucose.

Glucoamylase:
This enzyme breaks off a free glucose molecule from the complex sugar-based chains that form starch, disaccharides or polysaccharides. The glucose can than be freed up as a source of energy for the body.

Sucrase:
This enzyme breaks down sucrose into fructose and glucose. Sucrase is secreted by the tips of the villi of the small intestine. Individuals with celiac disease or intestinal inflammation may have trouble producing adequate sucrase.

Maltase:
This is the enzyme that helps break down the sugar maltose into two glucose molecules.

Lactase:
This is an enzyme that helps break down the sugar lactose into glucose and galactose. Many people are deficient in the enzyme lactase and are unable to process lactose, which leads to serious gastrointestinal distress and chronic inflammation.

Alpha-galactosidase:
This enzyme hydrolyses the terminal alpha-galactosyl moieties from glycolipids and glycoproteins found in starchy carbs. This enzyme is the active ingredient in many popular products that helps the body reduce gas production from beans and legumes.

This key enzyme helps break down the real tough polysaccharides and oligosaccharides found in foods that are tough to digest like nuts, beans, lentils and cruciferous veggies.

Cellulase:
This enzyme breaks down one of the major fibers in fruits and vegetables called cellulose. Cellulase breaks down cellulose into beta-glucose. Glucose from cellulose is released slowly and should not dramatically increase blood sugar but rather provide a more stable fuel for the body.

Proteolytic enzymes:

Proteolytic enzymes are necessary to metabolize protein molecules into amino acids. When individuals have a compromised digestive tract, they are unable to secrete adequate amounts of these proteolytic enzymes and they end up with large protein molecules that further irritate the gut and poor amino acid absorption which leads to deficiencies.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

About the author:
Dr David Jockers is a Maximized Living doctor and owns and operates Exodus Health Center in Kennesaw, Georgia where he specializes in functional nutrition, functional medicine and corrective chiropractic care to get to the underlying cause of major health problems.

His website features great articles on natural health and incredible recipes. He is the author of the best-selling book SuperCharge Your Brain - the complete guide to radically improve your mood, memory and mindset. He has over 42,000 active followers on his social media and email newsletter and is a big influencer in the Primal Health movement.

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Monday, July 21, 2014

Top 10 magnesium-rich foods to boost your intake of this essential mineral

Top 10 magnesium-rich foods to boost your intake of this essential mineral

 

(NaturalNews) Magnesium is one of the most important -- and yet often overlooked -- nutraceutical required for a healthy body and mind. Magnesium plays an important role in more than 300 biochemical reactions and processes in the body (1), but despite its importance, many people fail to get enough of the mineral in their regular diet. In fact, some reports estimate that as many as 80% of Americans don't get enough of this important mineral. (2)

Magnesium helps keep the immune system healthy, fights depression, helps prevent high blood pressure and muscle twitches like restless leg syndrome and reduces your risk of migraine headaches. (3) Some experts say the mineral may also play an important role in preventing Alzheimer's disease and colon cancer. (4)

So how can you make sure that you're getting enough magnesium in your diet? By adding a few foods that are super-rich in this vitally important mineral. Here's a list of the top 10 magnesium-rich foods to help you get started:

  • Greens: Green, leafy vegetables like spinach, Swiss chard, and turnip and beet greens contain from 31 mg to 156 mg of magnesium for every one-cup serving (spinach contains the most, turnip greens the least). Eating these greens raw in salads or lightly steamed are the best ways to ensure that you're maximizing your nutrient intake.
  • Seeds and nuts: When it comes to magnesium content, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds pack a punch, ranging from 113 mg (sunflower) to 192 mg (pumpkin) or more per quarter-cup serving. Cashews provide 117 mg of magnesium, and almonds offer about 62 mg of the mineral each per quarter-cup serving.
  • Organic tempeh: This soy product not only proves itself a versatile ingredient in the kitchen but also provides about 87 mg of magnesium per 4-ounce serving. A cup of raw soybeans offers a little less than twice that amount at 147 mg.
  • Organic tofu: If you like the idea of eating more soybeans, but tempeh just isn't your thing, you can still get soy's boost of magnesium by consuming tofu, which offers about 66 mg of magnesium per 4-ounce serving.
  • Cacao: Ounce per ounce, cacao is one of the world's richest sources of magnesium. Name sound unfamiliar? Scramble the letters a bit -- cacao is what we get cocoa and chocolate from. Its real name is Theobroma cacao, its genus name literally meaning "food of the gods." Cacao contains nearly 100 milligrams of magnesium for every 1-ounce serving, or 272 milligrams per 100 grams of cacao. The beans also contain a significant amount of other important nutrients, including powerful antioxidants which can battle the effects of aging.
  • Quinoa: This ancient grain contains the most magnesium, offering about 118 mg of the nutrient per three-quarter-cup serving. Not crazy about quinoa? Buckwheat and oats are other good grain sources of magnesium, containing 86 mg per 1-cup serving of buckwheat and 69 mg per quarter-cup serving of oats.
  • Summer squash: This nutrient-rich veggie can be prepared in a variety of ways, making it a pleasing choice for many different tastes and palates. Low in calories, summer squash still offers a good source of magnesium -- about 43 mg per one-cup serving. Winter squash offers about 27 mg for the same size serving. Other good veggie sources: beets, broccoli and Brussels sprouts, offering 39 mg, 33 mg and 31 mg of magnesium per 1-cup serving, respectively.
  • Raspberries: If you love fresh fruit, you have several options to boost your magnesium intake. Raspberries are one of the biggest fruit sources of the mineral, offering about 27 mg per 1-cup serving. Cantaloupe and strawberries both offer about 19 mg per 1-cup serving.
  • Black beans: Several types of beans offer high levels of magnesium, with black beans topping the list at about 120 mg per one-cup serving. Navy beans come in second at about 96 mg per 1-cup serving, followed by pinto beans at 86 mg and lima beans at 81 mg per 1-cup serving.
  • Seafood: The highest sources of magnesium come from plant sources, but if you really crave some seafood, tuna offers a respectable 48 mg of magnesium per 4-ounce serving, while scallops provides 42 mg of the mineral for the same size serving.


As you can see, magnesium can be found in a wide variety of foods. That's good news for people who like a varied diet. Even better news: All these foods contain other important nutrients, and including them in your meal planning is a great way to ensure that you stay as healthy as possible. Just be sure to choose organic products and produce to maximize your health benefits and avoid GMOs.

Source:

(1) http://blog.timesunion.com

(2) http://www.naturalnews.com

(3) http://www.naturalnews.com

(4) http://www.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com


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Categories: Health Blog